The Random Thoughts Thread

Dave

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At a gathering of friends at a restaurant. The first to to arrive gave them the name "Donner" and added some extra people. When the Host loudly announced "Donner party! Table for ... " he loudly corrected the number and apologetically said that some didn't make it. It got the reaction he wanted from some.
:lol
 
Stop Tossing Your Banana Peel on the Trail
That "organic litter" you just threw? It'll still be around in a year.

Pop quiz: You’re biking with a friend, zipping along a semi-rural road, when your buddy pulls a banana from his jersey, peels it with his teeth, and flings the skin into the ditch. What do you say?

a. “Dude! That’s littering.”
b. “Dude! What the f***?”
c. Nothing, because I don’t want to make waves.
d. Nothing, because I don’t see the problem.

A lot of people, I think, would opt for C or D. Well, I’m here to make a case for A. Or, if you don’t shy from strong language, B. The old hikers’ maxim “Take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints” doesn’t make an exception for food scraps—and it shouldn’t.

“But it’s just a banana peel,” I imagine some of you saying. “It’s organic, it’ll decompose!” That’s a common justification for tossing banana peels, apple cores, and so on out a car window or along a trail. The hypothetical cyclist from our quiz would almost certainly reach for that defense.
https://www.outsideonline.com/23713...eHslxQy_TiJY9pNs9g5rQZdOrDnJZsvCYTjxiiLyjtDBg

Different worlds but I'll confess to tossing the apple core in woods. Probably should re-think that.
 
https://www.outsideonline.com/23713...eHslxQy_TiJY9pNs9g5rQZdOrDnJZsvCYTjxiiLyjtDBg

Different worlds but I'll confess to tossing the apple core in woods. Probably should re-think that.
How come they don't last that long when they're sitting on my kitchen counter?

I'm going to call shenanigans on their claim of how long it takes for a banana peel to decompose. There's plenty of microbes and little critters that'll break that thing down long before that "up to two years" date rolls around. A composted banana peel breaks down in weeks. Can't imagine one laying in the dirt lasting two years.

I had a similar conversation with someone once when they saw me gutting and cleaning the trout I had just caught and then throwing the head and guts to the opposite side of the river. "What the heck are you doing?!" this person proclaimed. "Making a raccoon very happy", I replied.
 
My morning:
Let the dog out.
Make coffee.
Read an article about banana peels.
Read another article the first one references, then read a few more.
Begin to wonder about the wide disparity in decomposition times for a banana peel
Look up the average decomposition rates for banana peels in various climates.
Look up the average temperatures on Ladhar Bheinn.
Decide that while this article could be misleading, depending on climate, it's no great sacrifice for me to keep my banana peels.
Resolve not to throw away my banana peels while on a trail - especially if I'm somewhere with the same climate as my refrigerator freezer.
Remember I don't really like bananas.
Remember I don't hike.
Look around and wonder where the dog is.
 

TangoBlue

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Senior Staff
Founding Member
My morning:
Let the dog out.
Make coffee.
Read an article about banana peels.
Read another article the first one references, then read a few more.
Begin to wonder about the wide disparity in decomposition times for a banana peel
Look up the average decomposition rates for banana peels in various climates.
Look up the average temperatures on Ladhar Bheinn.
Decide that while this article could be misleading, depending on climate, it's no great sacrifice for me to keep my banana peels.
Resolve not to throw away my banana peels while on a trail - especially if I'm somewhere with the same climate as my refrigerator freezer.
Remember I don't really like bananas.
Remember I don't hike.
Look around and wonder where the dog is.
:keyboard Yeah, within reason, I think I'm going to continue adding to organic compost and food for woodland critters and insects.
 

TangoBlue

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Founding Member
Back in the day, my grandparents used to maintain a glorious garden with a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. They didn't have a garbage disposal so table scraps, peels, cores, etc. went into a waxed paper milk carton. That, in turn was dumped onto the garden pile of waste matter to decompose and eventually be tilled back into the soil.

I suppose this is now in violation of EPA rules for handling bio-waste? o_O
 

Haggis

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Senior Staff
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All our food scraps get put out into the midden pile, even the dreaded banana peels. What the animals don’t eat turns into glorious dirt. I also add any sawdust and gardening detritus to the pile for good measure. It’s the way things have always been done out here in the sticks.
 
My morning:
Let the dog out.
Make coffee.
Read an article about banana peels.
Read another article the first one references, then read a few more.
Begin to wonder about the wide disparity in decomposition times for a banana peel
Look up the average decomposition rates for banana peels in various climates.
Look up the average temperatures on Ladhar Bheinn.
Decide that while this article could be misleading, depending on climate, it's no great sacrifice for me to keep my banana peels.
Resolve not to throw away my banana peels while on a trail - especially if I'm somewhere with the same climate as my refrigerator freezer.
Remember I don't really like bananas.
Remember I don't hike.
Look around and wonder where the dog is.

HA!
 
My morning:
Let the dog out.
Make coffee.
Read an article about banana peels.
Read another article the first one references, then read a few more.
Begin to wonder about the wide disparity in decomposition times for a banana peel
Look up the average decomposition rates for banana peels in various climates.
Look up the average temperatures on Ladhar Bheinn.
Decide that while this article could be misleading, depending on climate, it's no great sacrifice for me to keep my banana peels.
Resolve not to throw away my banana peels while on a trail - especially if I'm somewhere with the same climate as my refrigerator freezer.
Remember I don't really like bananas.
Remember I don't hike.
Look around and wonder where the dog is.
That's good stuff right there!
 
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