bob91yj

Adventurist
Founding Member
#61
I truly think the Shiftpod is a step above what most of us consider to be a tent. The Shiftpod is more of a portable shelter. You could live out of one in relative comfort if you had to. I think they are sturdy/durable enough that relief agencies would be wise to consider them as "rapid response shelters" in the event of a disaster.
 
#62
In my opinion it's absolutely a step above what most consider a tent to be. I have spent many a miserable night in a tent flapping in the wind or stuck confined in a small place waiting for a storm to subside. I no longer care what the weather is doing when I use my Shiftpod. They have plenty of room inside and I would feel very comfortable in one if I had to live for an extended period of time.
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#64
My camp setup needs a new plan. ShiftPod ordered. They're going to ship it out today to make sure I have it by Expo East.

Comfort, ease of set up, main vehicle mobility. A good camping system will have some of all 3 elements but it seems like you have to concentrated mostly on just two. Except for what I have. My current setup kinda sucked in all 3 and I really wanted something better.

It was a serious tossup between Oztent and Shiftpod. Oztent is a more labor intensive setup but it's awnings and annexes allows for a public gathering area as well as a cooking area. It also gives you a staging area where you can keep the rain, mug, grass, whatever out of your sleeping area. i.e. Comfort. These are things the Shiftpod is currently missing as part of their system. I am looking forward to the tunnel system because that in of itself looks like it'll make a good staging area. The hub that can connect multiple ShiftPods looks like it will create a good gathering/cooking area. I hope they can execute both of those with the same ease of setting up the shelter. However those accessories are not available now. Oztent edges out Shiftpod on comfort.
screen_shot_2017-07-25_at_5.11.22_pm_1.png

Obviously the ShiftPod wins in how much less labor intensive the setup is vs Oztent. This is the part that really appeals to me. Thinking about it. This is the reason why I eyeball Go Fast Campers, AT Habitats, etc.. The idea that something unfolds and the majority of my camp setup is done. Thus my choice.
 
#69
Yeah, there are compromises in anything.

I can’t get over how easy it is to set up or take down, how much room it has, how weatherproof it is, or how much happier I am in it than I was in an OzTent, FlipPac or FWC.

:D
That's saying something! Lap of luxury right there!

What do you use for a cot or do you? Currently using Oz tent cots but they are heavy!
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#72
This a panorama of the interior of my Shiftpod at Overland Expo East.
PANO_20181110_074233.jpg

Some math:
  • The area of a hexagon can be found with the length of the side squared times the square root of 3 times 1.5. The side of the living space of the shiftpod is roughly 5'6"
  • This gives you about 78.6 sq. ft. of floor space. Roughly the equivalent of a small 10x8' bedroom.
  • The height of the Shiftpod is roughly 6'6". This gives you roughly 510 cu. ft. of living space (the sides and roof are domed out but the walls tilt in).
Mr Heater suggests using the following formula to calculate the amount of BTUs required but I think these are for enclosures with hard insulated walls.
  • Cubic Feet x Temperature Increase (Fahrenheit) x .133 = Required BTUs
  • Cubic Feet x Temperature Increase (Celsius) x .2394 = Required BTUs
Interesting things I found out.
 
#79
That's cool! Does it come with a floor?
It doesn't, but you can get one w/ the CLAM branded shelters. They're slightly more expensive. But to be honest, I actually hate floors. I'd rather put down a a tarp and a nice rug over dirt than use a cheap floor that I could puncture. I generally camp in the desert or places where I can put down pine boughs over the floor if I have to worry about snow or ice.

The great advantage of these ice shelters though is the ice screws that they use for anchoring. The ones that came w/ my shelter actually had a drill attachment. I'm not wasting time w/ bent pegs/stakes, I'm literally zipping them into the ground in a few seconds at each anchor.

 
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