The Random Thoughts Thread

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Darwin at work. Unfortunately, in today's world, he'll sue and win! We here on the board decry the damage done to such a precious resource. Victim is clueless to this and deserves compensation for his injuries.
Think in this case they may choose to forgo the trespassing change and $5000 fine. I would prefer community service over a fine actually. Make tourists watch a video of him explaining the injuries he sustained, the treatment he underwent and how important it is to stay on the boardwalk.

If they persist in leaving the boardwalk then, I don't know, Clockwork Orange therapy time and they have to watch the video in this incident?

https://www.kulr8.com/news/man-kill...cle_72fada01-fc54-5e8f-a6d4-16e28f2de518.html
 
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Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
Think in this case they may choose to forgo the trespassing change and $5000 fine. I would prefer community service over a fine actually. Make tourists watch a video of him explaining the injuries he sustained, the treatment he underwent and how important it is to stay on the boardwalk.

If they persist in leaving the boardwalk then, I don't know, Clockwork Orange therapy time and they have to watch the video in this incident?

https://www.kulr8.com/news/man-kill...cle_72fada01-fc54-5e8f-a6d4-16e28f2de518.html
x2
 
Given how photos from recon satellites have been reported to be so good that we can read license plates from space, I suppose I really shouldn't be surprised by either of these stories . . .


Displaying a “peace” V-sign when having a picture taken has become a staple pose for many in recent years. However, a new Chinese cybersecurity expert is warning that advances in camera phone technologies could mean the public is uploading photos to social media in high enough quality for it to be possible to “extract enough detail to make a perfect copy.”

The vice-director of the Shanghai Information Security Trade Association, Zhang Wei, is speaking on the issue, warning people that if your hand – and thus, fingerprint – is held close enough to the camera, it could be adequate enough for someone to perfectly replicate. Anyone with competent skills in photo magnifying and artificial intelligence-enhanced technologies would have no problem lifting a print, he says.

As for just how close one would need to stand to the camera to be in danger, Zhang claims anyone within five feet runs the risk of having their print stolen. A subject sporting the gesture is in danger of fingerprint molds being created, which poses security dangers. His remarks have spread like wildfire on social media, gathering more than 450 million views on China’s Weibo platform as of writing.

Feng Jianjiang, a professor of fingerprint identification at Tsinghua University, suggested people check the clarity of their fingerprints by zooming in before uploading them to social media.


and

A man who attacked a pop star in Japan reportedly managed to find out where she lived by studying the reflections in her eyes in photos she posted to social media.

NHK World-Japan reports that 26-year-old Hibiki Sato was indicted last week for the attack last month on the “idol”, who’s in her 20s.
As the woman returned to her Tokyo condo on the night of September 1st, Sato allegedly snuck up behind her, covered her mouth with a towel, pulled her down, groped her, and injured her.

After his arrest, Sato told police investigators that he was a big fan of the woman and that he had discovered where she lived through a social media photo in which he zoomed in and studied the light reflected from the woman’s eyes.

The reflections in your eyes in photos may reveal more than you think.

Sato says he was able to see details of the train station in her eyes, and he then used Google Street View to find his way to that station. Once there, he waited for the woman and then followed her back to her home.

While many people who post personal photos publicly on social media may be wary of sharing sensitive locations, most people presumably aren’t concerned with the reflections in their eyes. But with the rapid improvement in smartphone camera image quality, it’s yet another way one can possibly leak personal information that can be gleaned by online (and perhaps “real-life”) stalkers.
(via NHK via The Verge)


Sources:

https://fstoppers.com/news/security...sign-photos-claims-fingerprints-can-be-417204

https://petapixel.com/2019/10/14/at...tions-in-pop-stars-photos-to-locate-her-home/
 
For many years now the technology has been available to copy keys from nothing more than a photograph. Guess fingerprints were only a matter of time.

Deep fake technology has now progressed to the point that besides seamlessly integrating someone's face into a video, a persons voice can also be replicated using a brief recording of them speaking. Biometric security firms are going to need to step up their game.
 
Ran across an interesting YouTube video on the Fstoppers site. Expedition-type photographer doing a video on safety in the wild places. In his case, the island of Svalbard in the arctic. What first caught my eye was the picture of him with a rifle.

https://fstoppers.com/gear/safety-t...nd-landscape-photographers-going-trail-423882

It's a 28 minute video. You can skip the first 6 minutes.

He mentioned that he had served in the Greenland Dogsled patrol. This is an elite Danish military unit that takes off on months long patrols of Greenland in the dead of winter. Very interesting.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirius_Dog_Sled_Patrol
 
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