Show your kitchen setup!

weezerbot

Adventurist
Founding Member
#41
I have a FJ cruiser as well. Space is very valuable. I hate packing things to the celling. I prefer to utilize the little visibility that I have. I have been trying to get all smaller sized cooking things. Some of the backpacking products are just as nice. Then I can use them for a dual purpose. Not just car camping but adventure cycling and backpaking.

When it cools off I will be re-building my storage drawer system. Id like to keep
all my "chuck box" in one drawer.
Ya, we had the "Don Box" built in to our old FJ, which was a perfect set up, but I have no idea what plans Josh has for this new one, or frankly why we even have it....*ahem*:rolleyes:

When I camp in the 4runner I'm always solo so its very easy for me to pack, as I usually just bring backpacker meals/MRE's and lightweight gear. But for two of us we like to plan out actual meals that are more involved.

A couple years ago I was toying with the idea of building some kind of DRIFTA like set-up myself since they seem impossible to get in the US. Maybe I should go back to this idea, because then it would be something we could move between trucks.
 

Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#42
Drifta USA is based up in the PNW (owners name is Luke IIRC), not unobtainium if you wanted one, and not too hard to mimic the basic layout. One of my favorite chuck box designs.

[video=youtube;syjxRmSX6BI]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syjxRmSX6BI[/video]

[video=youtube;T_jQMoU4-vM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_jQMoU4-vM[/video]
 

weezerbot

Adventurist
Founding Member
#43
Well, I guess I'm confused then because I can't find any info on shipping within the US on their website, all I see are places around Australia. The last I heard they got a container up to Canada but never heard anything about here. If anyone knows who the vendor is here that I can purchase from please let me know!
 

Finn

Adventurist
#44
Thanks for the info Dave! I searched for Drfta USA and found this company selling their products here in the U.S. I'm going to have to save up my pennies for a while. I can't wait to see these in person. The only down side seems to be the size. I'd like to build something similar of my own.

http://www.3dogcampingusa.com/brands/DRIFTA.html
 
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weezerbot

Adventurist
Founding Member
#45
Yep the more I look at these the more I think I could find someone with better woodworking skills than mine alone to build one fore probably less than half the price. I do have a lot of time on my hands these days though...hmmmmmm
 

taugust

Adventurist
Founding Member
#48
I was just sorting my gear for an upcoming voyage to the islands, and I made this observation: my trusty Coleman camp stove is the oldest piece of field gear I own, dating back 31 years. All other field gear (and climbing gear) is routinely replaced due to wear, but that old Coleman stove is bulletproof, and it has really served me well over the decades. I certainly got my money's worth out of it, and then some... now, for sentimental reasons, I don't want to part with it, since it has accompanied me on so many excellent wilderness adventures. Sure, I still BBQ, or cook food directly over the fire, but for purely utilitarian purposes, that Coleman stove is the ticket. Thing will probably outlast me... I know there are other stoves out there, some undoubtedly more efficient, but this old Coleman has a history behind it, and I used it nationwide back in the days of paid tourism. Of course, I'm known for using things till they literally fall apart, or wear out from thrashing hard in the field... on the other hand, if it ain't broke, don't fix it, aye? When I die, I want that Coleman to be buried with me, so if I actually make it to Heaven I'll have a reliable stove on which to make my "cowboy coffee"---if I wind up in the other place, I reckon I won't need a stove, 10-4? :eek:
I think I have to say the same. I have had my Coleman stove for about 20 years. I bought it used at a garage sale for $10. It was made in the early 1950's. It is over 10 years older than I am, and it is still going strong. I replaced a few parts that weren't working (that I now know I didn't need to replace, just repair). There is info and parts online to repair and rebuild them, and make them good as new. Recently, looking on Craigslist, I found a 3 burner Coleman stove and two older lanterns that I have brought back (with minimal effort) to working condition. They were made in the mid 1950's to the early 1970's, and cost almost nothing. Oil the pump cup leather and replace the fuel cap gaskets, and you are in business. There are not many pieces of gear that will work as new, and still have parts available 60 years (or more) after they were made. Do a search on Ebay for Coleman stove or Coleman lantern, and see what you get.
 

Railsplitter

Adventurist
Banned!
#49
Yeah, I copy that... I have a Coleman propane lantern as well, but it's only about 10 years old. Thing's still like new, since it came with a hard plastic carrying case. I DID break down and finally bought a metal screen to replace the glass globe, after breaking and replacing about 3 or 4 of those globes over the years. I don't always use the lantern---a headlamp is actually far more efficient for campsite tasks, and I always have a fire going anyway---but it's nice to have in case you suddenly feel the need to illuminate the entire area around your table. I gotta have bulletproof gear in my campsite, equipment that will still function properly after rattling down a bumpy dirt road in the middle of nowhere. Besides, I underwent a transition years ago in my approach to outdoor adventures: if I'm going climbing or tackling peaks out on BLM land, I go Alpine style, traveling fast and light, leaving all the heavier gear back at Base Camp, so to speak. I used to like the idea of carrying everything I needed in a backpack and camping in remote locations up in the mountains or out in the desert, but then I transitioned into traveling light and returning to Base Camp to enjoy all the amenities, including a full-sized camp stove with the same cookware I use in the kitchen here at the house. I like a campfire under the stars too, and there's no way I'm hauling firewood any great distance from my vehicle. Nowadays, the only time I bivouac without a large pile of firewood is out on the islands, where light discipline is required anyway. Say, you're up in Cuyamaca... were you there when the fire rolled through a few years ago?
 

Railsplitter

Adventurist
Banned!
#50
One other observation: when my friend and I pulled our 3-day desert camping/sailing expedition to Borrego and the Salton Sea, the stove went with me as always. We pulled that trip right after St. Patrick's Day, so, along with all the other grub purchased for the expedition, I brought a HUGE POT of homemade Irish Stew in my largest cooler, the same pot in which I usually make spaghetti noodles, if that tells ya anything. The very idea of trying to balance that gigantic pot on a small, lightweight backpacking stove is utterly ridiculous, LOL. Ah, yes, I remember that trip well: there's nothing like macking piping hot Irish Stew by a campfire at dawn... anything which tastes that good in the field HAS to be health food, 10-4??? LOL. I do a lot of that, BTW, hauling pots of leftovers out to the field; some foods actually taste better after sitting in the fridge for a day or two (pasta sauce, for example).
 

taugust

Adventurist
Founding Member
#51
Say, you're up in Cuyamaca... were you there when the fire rolled through a few years ago?
Yes, I was. Not great memories. Our house was missed, but many around were destroyed. Good clearance around works. Nine and a half years later, things have mostly recovered, but you can still see the scars all around. It's a good reminder to be prepared for disasters. Camping equipment and experience will serve you well.
 
#53
Here is our setup. I built the drawers/sleeping platform back in 2009 and have not may many changes since then.


Our kitchen drawer is now organized with TrekPak dividers!
 

Garrett

Adventurist
#55
Put my trusty Coleman in the middle and voila. The folding grill goes on the ground or on a portable table. Dishwasher is a "Byer of Maine trilite wash station" but you won't find it near the bed!

13.jpg
 

Yuman Desert Rat

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Founding Member
#58
Here is our setup. I built the drawers/sleeping platform back in 2009 and have not may many changes since then.


Our kitchen drawer is now organized with TrekPak dividers!
Which Trek Pak package did you buy to be able to do the drawer? Also, what kknd of spigot is that on your H2O system? Thanks.
 
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