Tire Repair Kits

#21
CONUS, yes I bring a cordless tool kit, great idea on the reamer. OCONUS you only have so much space and weight when you fly.

Tire repair was the only thing we had to perform maintenance wise while touring Namibia. I was surprised when the tour company didn’t supply a repair kit. Granted the average customer more than likely doesn’t possess the skill set to utilize the tool.
Agreed. But, a tap handle and a hex shank drill bit would probably work about as well. I've never tried it that way, but is seems that might address this and some of the issues Jonathan Hanson mentions above.
 

Robert

Adventurist
#22
Mine looks about like Dave's with the addition of some patches and a tube repair kit; all shoved in a Husky organizer pouch (couple bucks for three sizes at the local HD https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-8...Part-Organizer-Bag-Pouch-HD25200-TH/312387470 ). I still need to add one of those Colby valves but I do carry a spare valve. I also carry a couple spare lug nuts. I wish we could still buy the old vulcanizing patches but I haven't seen them in the States since probably the late eighties or so.

The tube repair kit is a spare for the bike but I've also patched a radiator hose that sprang a leak. Clean it up, apply patch, cut piece of beer can or whatever to apply over that (reinforces it) then wrap with a strip of bicycle inner tube or whatever you have. Top off radiator, continue driving.
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#23
I have my ARB kit that I haven't looked at in 4 years and now that task has been added to this weekend's list of things to-do. I should repack it anyway. The ARB case takes up a lot of space. Move the cobly valves in with that kit. etc..
 

Robert

Adventurist
#24
I have my ARB kit that I haven't looked at in 4 years and now that task has been added to this weekend's list of things to-do. I should repack it anyway. The ARB case takes up a lot of space. Move the cobly valves in with that kit. etc..
If you haven't done so, put your plugs in a Ziploc bag and it'll help keep them soft. If it has a tube of cement and it's been opened it's probably dried, even if not I've punctured them to find the glue unusable.
 

Dave

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#25
If you haven't done so, put your plugs in a Ziploc bag and it'll help keep them soft. If it has a tube of cement and it's been opened it's probably dried, even if not I've punctured them to find the glue unusable.
Good point. I wonder what the shelf life is on tire plugs since they’re stored inside mega hot vehicle interiors?
 
#27
I've never pulled a bad one out of plastic. They seem like they're impregnated with some kind of solvent that evaporates, but even the little two-sided plastic sheets are enough to keep them alive for a long time. I have seen a few dry out, but I never had to try a dry one. I suspect it might still work as long as it was pliable. I know the cement is for patches, but I would probably try a little in that situation if I had it available.
 

Dean

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Founding Member
#28
They seem like they're impregnated with some kind of solvent that evaporates, but even the little two-sided plastic sheets are enough to keep them alive for a long time. I have seen a few dry out, but I never had to try a dry one.
Yeah, I've had the ones on the outside edge get a little dry, but the ones in the middle are usually gooey as goose s***.
 

Robert

Adventurist
#31
Great job on that sidewall!
I had to go back and look at that and I'm honestly surprised that held with no stitching- that's based solely on what I've been shown though. Would you have done it differently?

For reference, I've plugged a sidewall on several occasions but it was always just a thorn or nail so only one sticky plug. The two times I can recall slicing a sidewall I swapped on the spare and went easy until I could get a new tire. I've seen several sidewall repairs demonstrated, but never seen one done in the field.

I have repaired a motorcycle sidewall in Laos (on a Honda Baja 250)- luckily it wasn't bad and I put a patch on the inside of the tire and a new tube in it so definitely not the same thing as a large cut on an truck tire.
 

Jonathan Hanson

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Founding Member
#33
I had to go back and look at that and I'm honestly surprised that held with no stitching- that's based solely on what I've been shown though. Would you have done it differently?
For me it would depend on where I was. If I were, say, in the middle of the Madigan Line in the Simpson Desert and it were my only spare, I'd take the time to demount the tire, stitch it and patch it from the inside. If I just had to limp a few (slow) miles and it was getting dark, I'd give the plugs a try. And if plugs are all you have, well then . . .
 

Dave

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#34
For me it would depend on where I was. If I were, say, in the middle of the Madigan Line in the Simpson Desert and it were my only spare, I'd take the time to demount the tire, stitch it and patch it from the inside. If I just had to limp a few (slow) miles and it was getting dark, I'd give the plugs a try. And if plugs are all you have, well then . . .
What do you recommend for tire sidewall stitching tools and material?
 

Jonathan Hanson

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Founding Member
#35
Dave, the Extreme Outback kit comes with really good thread and needles, and their roughing/rolling tool doubles as a decent needle pusher. But waxed (synthetic) Ieatherworking thread and needles work very well too. And a cordless drill helps a whole bunch to pre-drill the stitch holes. Someone mentioned a tap handle and hex-shank drill bit; I'll have to try that! Extreme Outback Ultimate Puncture Repair Kit.jpg
 
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Jonathan Hanson

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#36
Incidentally, a couple people have mentioned using a drill to ream the puncture hole for a plug. This no doubt works great; however, my understanding is that for a simple nail puncture or similar, the plug kit's reamer mostly just separates the steel belt wires rather than cutting them, leaving the belt stronger than if you drilled and cut through them. I have no solid evidence on this, so consider it just food for thought. With a thin enough plug you shouldn't have to drill, although I've had a hell of a time on a few E-rated tires.
 
#39
Incidentally, a couple people have mentioned using a drill to ream the puncture hole for a plug. This no doubt works great; however, my understanding is that for a simple nail puncture or similar, the plug kit's reamer mostly just separates the steel belt wires rather than cutting them, leaving the belt stronger than if you drilled and cut through them. I have no solid evidence on this, so consider it just food for thought. With a thin enough plug you shouldn't have to drill, although I've had a hell of a time on a few E-rated tires.
^^^Well put.
The proper use for reamer/cutter bits is when the puncture breaks the steel belts and frayed ends are visible around the "wound channel" on the inside of the tire. The frayed ends will eventually cut through patches or plugs from the normal flexing as you drive.
 

Jonathan Hanson

Adventurist
Founding Member
#40
Pretty much what I figured. I've seen the waxed thread recommended but the two demonstrations I can think of off the top of my head they used wire (safety wire IRC) after poking holes with an awl. Like you said, it'd be a last resort.
Yes! Wire works very well. You want something thin enough so the interior patch can seal over it, but with decent strength.
 
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