Tire Repair Kits

#5
Pro-Tip = cordless drill

I used to own a grading company and we also did a lot of bobcat work. Having 10 or 15 trucks and trailers rolling through construction sites every day will get you pretty good at plugging tires. Those T-handled reamers are OK if that's all you have, but if you need to get a plug or two in load range E tire or a stubborn radial, a cordless drill will clean the puncture up into a nice clean round hole that's a lot easier to plug. You'll still want a hammer sometimes to bang it in, but I probably put a hundred of 'em in that way and never had to do one twice.
 
#6
Here's a couple of tips based upon my 40+ years in the tire business. As @Code Red stated, a cordless drill will help immensely. Go to your local tire shop and buy your patches there, they will have better quality patches, a big selection and they buy them in bulk and will likely just give you a handful. As to the drill mentioned above, it works even better if you get a "cutter" bit which will cut off the broken edges of the steel belt if the puncture is in the tread area. To my knowledge they are available through tire suppliers.
 
#8
Pro-Tip = cordless drill

I used to own a grading company and we also did a lot of bobcat work. Having 10 or 15 trucks and trailers rolling through construction sites every day will get you pretty good at plugging tires. Those T-handled reamers are OK if that's all you have, but if you need to get a plug or two in load range E tire or a stubborn radial, a cordless drill will clean the puncture up into a nice clean round hole that's a lot easier to plug. You'll still want a hammer sometimes to bang it in, but I probably put a hundred of 'em in that way and never had to do one twice.
CONUS, yes I bring a cordless tool kit, great idea on the reamer. OCONUS you only have so much space and weight when you fly.

Tire repair was the only thing we had to perform maintenance wise while touring Namibia. I was surprised when the tour company didn’t supply a repair kit. Granted the average customer more than likely doesn’t possess the skill set to utilize the tool.
 

Dean

Adventurist
Founding Member
#10
I have an ARB kit that I'm slowly adding stuff to. Looking at adding sole Colby valves, although I just saw I4WTA instructor Kyle Buchter demo a really trick "funnel" for inserting a valve stem into a wheel. Looked like a smooth action so I'm considering adding that to the kit.
 

Finn

Adventurist
#12
I had used the ARB kit for years with great success. I probably plugged at least ten tires with it, mine and others. I have been meaning to replace the kit as I was running out of plugs and wanted to just give it a good refresh. I came across this kit from Powertank and really like it. It includes everything the ARB Kit did but folds up into a much smaller package.

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It even fits perfect in on of the Gladiators rear cubby’s...

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Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#16
I had used the ARB kit for years with great success. I probably plugged at least ten tires with it, mine and others. I have been meaning to replace the kit as I was running out of plugs and wanted to just give it a good refresh. I came across this kit from Powertank and really like it. It includes everything the ARB Kit did but folds up into a much smaller package.

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It even fits perfect in on of the Gladiators rear cubby’s...

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That kit is very nice!
 

Herbie

Adventurist
#17
That's my only complaint with the ARB kit. That molded plastic case is cool, but it's bulky and there is sssooo much wasted space.
My life has been infinitely better since I gave myself permission to be free of blow-molded plastic cases. Every power-tool, wrench-set, or specialty tool I owned was taking up massive amounts of space. When I had a socket-set case come apart at the "hinge", I ditched the case and realized the used volume was 1/10th the original, so I went through my whole shop and recycled, craigslisted, or gave away literally every molded case. Same thing when I buy new tools now - the tool gets a home in the shop and the case goes away. Bliss.
 

Dean

Adventurist
Founding Member
#18
My life has been infinitely better since I gave myself permission to be free of blow-molded plastic cases.
Yes. Even smaller boxes/bins/etc. I'm itching to get my Wrangler back so I can fully overhaul my gear storage system. I have a sad feeling I'll be blowing an entire paycheck (or two) at work just on stuff we make. I thought this wasn't going to be a problem, but the more I see how people utilize our stuff the more ideas I get and it's not good for my bank account.
 

Jonathan Hanson

Adventurist
Founding Member
#19
I like these hybrid kits some have put together. I agree on blow-molded cases, although the ARB/Colby kit is really quick to use, unlike the otherwise superb Extreme Outback Ultimate kit, which is unsurpassed in contents but crammed into a small case. Many kits I've used over the course of plugging . . . perhaps 200-300? . . . tires in classes and in the field have plugs that are too thick for most nail or screw holes. I addressed the issue here.
 
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