Let's smoke something!

#21
This is my standard recipe for smoked Salmon. Indian Candy! It's easy and non-critical.

1 Gal. fresh water.
2 Cups non-iodized salt.
4 lbs. Dark Brown Sugar
2 Cups real Maple Syrup

Mix brine and soak salmon for 1 to 2 days. I use an ice chest with a large stainless steel pot inside, with ice around the pot.

Smoke with Apple and Alder Wood, Brinkman smoker charcoal 2 hours max!

You can brush the pieces with a mixture of 3/4 honey to 1/4 water halfway through, if you like.

Cool, then package in Food Saver vacuum seal bags. Store in refrigerated space
 
#22
This is my standard recipe for smoked Salmon. Indian Candy! It's easy and non-critical.

1 Gal. fresh water.
2 Cups non-iodized salt.
4 lbs. Dark Brown Sugar
2 Cups real Maple Syrup

Mix brine and soak salmon for 1 to 2 days. I use an ice chest with a large stainless steel pot inside, with ice around the pot.

Smoke with Apple and Alder Wood, Brinkman smoker charcoal 2 hours max!

You can brush the pieces with a mixture of 3/4 honey to 1/4 water halfway through, if you like.

Cool, then package in Food Saver vacuum seal bags. Store in refrigerated space
Word on the street, (my charcuterie book) farmed salmon is better for smoking due to the fat marbling. My dad would be angry at me for saying this, for he is a commercial fisherman.
 
#23
BBQ'n is some thing we do all year round. Low & slow cooking. Meet "LaRuca" Old Country Pit built in Texas. 20" round 3\16" thick steal offset cooker with adjustable tuning plate & thermostatic blower fan system. She puts out some killer BBQ.
1st four pic's is beef short ribs cooked over mesquite wood, 2 hrs on the grill, 2 1\2 hrs covered in a red wine braising liquid with root vegetables.
next three pic's BBQ'd smoke turkey breast, next two are BBQ'd bacon wrapped pork loin, next two BBQ'd pork ribs, BBQ'd Boston Butt, BBQ's Sausage, southern mac & cheese, cole slaw, BBQ's beans, last photo is BBQ'd Nacho's with pulled pork. The woods I use Mesquite for beef, pork is Hickory, chicken is Pecan all have a mixture of Red Oak. What mean is 50% red oak & 50% mesquite. The red oak puts out the heat while the others enhance the flavor

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#27
BBQ for the wife today. Made her BBQ jerked pork tenderloin sliders w\ a Caribbean mango cole slaw.
I made jerk seasoning rub applied it to the pork tenderloin last night, then made the Caribbean glaze. I smoked the pork tenderloin over charcoal & pecan, glazing every 20 minutes until done. I cooked this using a small Weber Smokey Joe charcoal kettle grill.
Boy they were great & she was a happy, happy girl. We are putting together a recipe book when we go camping of our favorite BBQ dishes. This will be one of them.

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#33
that should hold some meat TACMEDIC

I gave my son my offset stick burner "La Ruca" & went with 2 vertical insulated competition reverse flow water\dry BBQ Smokers: Backwoods Chubby 3400 & Red Box which is the little brother to the Backwoods. I like the Red Box alot for the size I can take it camping with us for ribs, whole brisket or flats, points, pork butt's, whole chickens.
Both can burn full trays of charcoal\wood chunks for 10 hrs. I have both smokers set up with thermostat controlled draft assist blower fans.
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Mccaf

Adventurist
#35
your food looks so good ! I’ve actually been researching pellet grills the last couple days.
But I’m gonna look into those also. I like the portability of them and mayby they can run a DC for camping.

I’m probably going to ditch my kamado joe of that I’ve had for a long time, just want to Try something else, I probably keep it if I had the space. Right now I’m leaning toward the green mountain grill Jim Bowie, because it goes up to 550, has great searing capability, and got a love that little pizza oven accessory.
 
#36
I have nothing against pellet droppers. Me I perfer charcoal\wood chunks. Both of my verticals insulated cookers maintain temperature extremely well w\o drops or spikes. I use the assist draft blower to increase the temp's if I'm running a water pan. The water pan is a heat sink & provides moisture air that makes the food more moist than a dry cooker does. The dry cooker you have to mop, spriz, inject, or brine the meat to keep it moist. Both of my cookers can be used as water or dry cooker by replacing the large water pan with a heat diffuser with in a few seconds. The burn rate of fuel charcoal\wood chunks @ low cooking temps is any were of 7 to 11 hours one tray load, longer if you add continously. Another good factor to these vertical insulated water\dry cookers are they are reverse flow which acts like convection cooking system without a fan, the heat comes from the top & the exhaust draws it downward is located @ the bottom of the cook chamber.

The Red Box is 75lbs measurements :15"D x 16"W x 28"T
The Backwoods Chubby is 130lbs measurements: 19"D x 20"W x 29"T
Red Box cooking capacity "realistic" 2 large 6 to 9lb Pork Butts or 6 slabs of 10 bone pork ribs: st. louis style cut, or babybacks or 2 beef brisket points or flats or 2 large spatchcock chickens or 4 large turkey breast or 4 Tri Tip's if cooked brisket style.

Backwoods Chubby food capacity "realistic" 2 large 6 to 9lb Pork Butts or 8 slabs of 10 bone pork ribs: prep'd st. louis style, or babybacks, 1 whole packer beef brisket 15 to 25lbs trimmed to fit or 6 spatchcock chickens or 4 whole chickens or 6 large turkey breast, 6 Beef Tri Tip Roast cooked brisket style.

Each cooker comes with extra racks, heat diffusers are sold separate.
Here's were I bought mine from https://ssomd.com/
Mark Lambert is a honest good guy.
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#38
Awesome! I'm a new convert to smoking, my parents bought me one for my birthday. I have been able to figure out how to get over the plateau yet.
The only good way to get over the plateau is to be patient & let what ever you're smoking do it's thing. When you know you're close, watch it carefully. Once it makes the jump, it can go quickly from there and you can easily overcook it. Something most all of us learned the hard way the first couple of times. Don't make the mistake of cranking up the heat to try and get it over the hump, as that rarely works out well. If it's really a problem, like say in a BBQ competition or where time is a factor, you're better off using the Texas Crutch (wrapping it in foil) for a little bit. Again, watching it carefully so you notice when it jumps. Some types of smokers handle it better than others, but I'd also try to avoid opening the smoker "to see how it's looking" as much as possible, as this can also delay getting past the plateau.

I've smoked two identical pork buts, on the same smoker side by side and had one reach the plateau and finish cooking before the other. The same has happened with whole packer briskets. This is one of the reasons many guys/gals cook more than one cut of meat for a competition. If you can't/don't want to stand by your smoker staring at the temp gauge, invest in a good meat thermometer that allows you to set an alarm at specific temps.
 

Mccaf

Adventurist
#39
I have nothing against pellet droppers. Me I perfer charcoal\wood chunks. Both of my verticals insulated cookers maintain temperature extremely well w\o drops or spikes. I use the assist draft blower to increase the temp's if I'm running a water pan. The water pan is a heat sink & provides moisture air that makes the food more moist than a dry cooker does. The dry cooker you have to mop, spriz, inject, or brine the meat to keep it moist. Both of my cookers can be used as water or dry cooker by replacing the large water pan with a heat diffuser with in a few seconds. The burn rate of fuel charcoal\wood chunks @ low cooking temps is any were of 7 to 11 hours one tray load, longer if you add continously. Another good factor to these vertical insulated water\dry cookers are they are reverse flow which acts like convection cooking system without a fan, the heat comes from the top & the exhaust draws it downward is located @ the bottom of the cook chamber.

The Red Box is 75lbs measurements :15"D x 16"W x 28"T
The Backwoods Chubby is 130lbs measurements: 19"D x 20"W x 29"T
Red Box cooking capacity "realistic" 2 large 6 to 9lb Pork Butts or 6 slabs of 10 bone pork ribs: st. louis style cut, or babybacks or 2 beef brisket points or flats or 2 large spatchcock chickens or 4 large turkey breast or 4 Tri Tip's if cooked brisket style.

Backwoods Chubby food capacity "realistic" 2 large 6 to 9lb Pork Butts or 8 slabs of 10 pork ribs: prep'd st. louis style, or babybacks, 1 whole packer beef brisket 15 to 25lbs trimmed to fit or 6 spatchcock chickens or 4 whole chickens or 6 large turkey breast, 6 Beef Tri Tip Roast cooked brisket style.

Each cooker comes with extra racks, heat diffusers are sold separate.
Here's were I bought mine from https://ssomd.com/
Mark Lambert is a honest good guy.
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All good points and info! Thanks for chiming in I hope you were gonna put some information up. Definitely have to consider this while I’m shopping for a new rig cheers and HNY!
 
#40
if your look'n you aint cook'n. I like using butcher paper for brisket, foil for butts. The steaming IMO helps the meat get past the stall most of the times. But in some cases I've ran into the stall were the internal temperature wouldn't move for over an hour even thought I wrapped my brisket in butchers paper twice. Some meats IMO will just be difficult to get past that point.
I like BBQ'n Chicken \ Turkey with dry smoke (w\heat diffuser no water pan) charcoal w\cherrywood chunks @ 275 to 300 degrees, Pork Butts with wet smoke (water pan) charcoal, hickory & applewood chunks @ 235 degrees wrapped in foil after internal temp of 160 back in the cooker until 198 removed from the pit with 45 minute to 1 hour rest.
If I'm BBQ'n Pork Butt's Arthur Bryant style "sliced" I'll cook them until a internal temp of 165 over smoke the entire time with charcoal, hickory chunks & applewood chunks @ 235 degrees.
Beef Brisket with wet smoke (water pan) charcoal & mesquite chunks @ 225 degrees wrapped in butchers paper twice @ 165 internal temp until a 198 internal, I'll remove it from the pit followed 2hr rest before slicing or chop.
Pork Ribs I'll trim up to a 10 bone comp style rib, cook wet smoke @ 235 for 3 hour's onsmoke wrap for 45 minutes, pulled from the pit, unwrap, rest on the cutting board for 15 minutes before slicing.
Wrapping meat "for me" I like the appearance \ presentation is part of that eat with your eyes, meat can only take on so much smoke & it aids in quicker cook by braising your meat, allowing the internal temp to rise faster. Some will add apple juice, apple cider vingear, beef broth, injection liquids, butter, brown sugar BBQ sauce, water. Me I do not add any thing, I want the natural liquids \ juices of the meat to tenderize braise in the foil wrap.
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