Camp Chef Vs Partner Stoves

Herbie

Adventurist
#21
I guess the main obsession with PSS is that it uses common stove parts and easy to repair. Replacement parts are cheap and easy to find. 2 needle valves, $9.00. Replacement stainless burner, $10.00. 2 valve knobs, $5.00. Burner mixing tube, $15.00 short, $19.00 long. Getting to those parts to fix is easy too. That also makes it easier to clean
The other "selling point" of the PSS is the ruggedness. They were originally built for river rats, so they can take a lot of abuse.

That said, that level of toughness isn't justified for everyone for the price or weight.

My Stansport Dual-Fuel stove was $36 and has given me seven+ years of solid service without a single hiccup. For the advantages in size, weight, and cost, I can (and do) carry a second burner which occasionally sees simultaneous use, and gives me a redundant cook system should the need arise (which it hasn't yet). The point is that there are a lot of ways to reach your meal-prep zen. "Cry once, buy the best" is an often-quoted bit of advice, but so is "the best is the enemy of good enough".
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#22
"Cry once, buy the best" is an often-quoted bit of advice, but so is "the best is the enemy of good enough".
"good enough" got me pretty far so I can't argue. If it wasn't for getting a do-I-really-want-to-take-this-last-one-home discount at an expo east for a PSS I'd still be using my Mr. Heater basecamp stove. The reason why I got it was it looked exactly like a GSI stove. Basecamp is no longer available. GSI has a new model. So once it breaks it's garbage.

Except for PSS I can't really get into brand loyalty in this case. They're all rolling out of the same factory in China. Look at the Camp Chef single burner for $29.99, the Generic for $12.00, the Stansport for $40.99, the Home Depot for $29.29.

Don't know how it will handle camping trips or how much fuel you'll need but if you want small and portable (13"x13.5"x4") with 15,000 BTU. Sterno portable butane single burner for about $60.
 
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#23
Checked out PSS because of all the positive mentions but had sticker shock. Ended up with a Camp Chef Everest for a year but it was attached to a platform drawer that was recently sold. Solid performer but didn't feel any better than the Century stove I "upgraded" from.

Decided I missed my roots and went back to torturing myself with a liquid fuel Coleman. Made in 78 and cherry picked from a dozen others around craigslist for between $20 and $50. I would say more but I have to go pump it again before it goes out. :D
 
#24
Decided I missed my roots and went back to torturing myself with a liquid fuel Coleman. Made in 78 and cherry picked from a dozen others around craigslist for between $20 and $50. I would say more but I have to go pump it again before it goes out. :D
My buddy has a Partner stove, so I was looking at upgrading from my '70s Coleman 425. Instead, I bought a Stansport Propane Converter on Amazon for $20, and it works great! I have no idea what BTU it is putting out, but boils in a reasonable time, simmers great, and smells a Hell of a lot better than some of my 20 year old Coleman fuel!

I bought the Coleman new, and have been a fiend at keeping it clean, so it is in fantastic shape. I even store it in the original carton, which fits pefectly in my Hiker trailer.

Amazon Link
 
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Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#27
that sure is pretty but for that price, I would want to see a higher output.
I suspect that's a trade off getting a stove that thin in the first iteration. If it's popular then it will be copied and they, or someone else, may achieve higher BTU output with improvements.
 
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