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I agree with @smlobx. Yes gearing can help facilitate that low-end grunt which we all covet (or at least most of us). But with a gasoline and diesel engine of comparable torque outputs, the gasoline will, generally-speaking, require lower (numerically higher) gearing in order to produce driving characteristics similar to that of the diesel. The real beauty of a diesel is that the low-end torque is already inherent to the engine, so you don't need to compromise fuel economy by going too low with the gearing.
True, but ... how much torque do you need to get up a grade? Really?

Just going to leave this here >>

Are we talking lightweight trucks or land whales? Becuase we seem to be comparing lighter vehicles/engine combos to land whales.

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I think in most areas of North America, the range issue isn't a huge deal. I know that in parts of Canada and Alaska, fuel stops need to be planned appropriately. I think fuel costs, more than anything else, will incentivize some, though not all, truck owners to at least consider diesel engine options. Fuel is relatively cheap now. Lots of people driving around my neighborhood with empty 1/2 ton's for the cool factor alone. The next big jump in fuel prices will likely change that trend.
Seriously, where are these 500-mile overland trails in the lower 48 that don't have gas along the way? I have yet to still need to dip into a spare jerry can, but dudes are always talking about 50-gallon tanks and having 10 jerry cans.

I'm serious, I want to go on a long route. So far the longest continuous was 270ish miles.
 
True, but ... how much torque do you need to get up a grade? Really?
It's hard to justify any of this as a "need." No one needs a diesel engine, just like no one needs a lifted jeep with 37" tires (or a Power Wagon) and a Marlin reduction unit. Some have those things because they prefer it.


Seriously, where are these 500-mile overland trails in the lower 48 that don't have gas along the way? I have yet to still need to dip into a spare jerry can, but dudes are always talking about 50-gallon tanks and having 10 jerry cans.

I'm serious, I want to go on a long route. So far the longest continuous was 270ish miles.
I don't know if there are 500 mile stretches without fuel stations, but you can very easily put together some very long and remote routes in northern Canada. Fuel stations in some of those areas aren't always open, aren't always stocked up, or in some areas they just don't exist. Fuel capacity and range is an important planning factor up there. It's one particular area where diesel can make a lot of sense, especially when you consider that gasoline is priced about the same as diesel fuel, sometimes higher.
 
I choose not to live in communist countries.
Politics aside, there is some very beautiful country up there. It's very easy to find some scenic lakes and campsites all to yourself. If you pick the right areas to explore, you can potentially go days without seeing another soul.

And to be honest, I don't think politics has much of anything to do with the fuel situation up there....it's just the nature of living up in the remote north. Alaska is pretty similar in that regard.
 

Sempertoy

Adventurist
Founding Member
Na. Not exactly but related to Poe's Law. No visual indication was given that it was a joke to the readers and the context of the thread up to this point didn't give an indication either. I was more along the lines of "not sure if serious" when I read it a few days ago.
Thank you for teaching me something new today, totally unrelated to what I came here for.
 
I just sold my full size diesel. In the 2+ years of owning and driving it, I came to the realization that the "fuel cost/economy" savings was a myth.

I've driven coast to coast and in all seasons and what I noticed was that by and large, diesel prices were as much OR MORE than gasoline everywhere I went. No real savings there at the pump, maybe pennies per gallon but overall I always felt like gas was cheaper. Not talking B20 either, I'm talking good old Diesel #2. I did get better fuel economy than my Tacoma overall, but gallon for gallon the cost averages out once the significantly more expensive diesel maintenance costs (DEF, oil changes, fuel filter changes, air filters) were accounted for.

Add in the lack of convenience factor in North America where diesel is the oddball fuel that many stations don't carry and yeah, it was not as good as I had hoped overall. I do like driving a diesel (unlimited POWER!), but the driving experience was outweighed by these other factors.
I 100% agree. I had a 2016 F350 Platinum diesel and it was a PITA. Not worth the expense and hassle. I like my Power Wagon way better and I also liked my old 2013 F150 ecoburst better.
 
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