The Fire Thread

Dave

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#1
There are many ways to make fire in an emergency - post your favorite method here!

Steel Wool + 9 Volt battery = FIRE

[video=youtube;Iha9vQvnWMU]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iha9vQvnWMU[/video]
 

Trump

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#5
For an emergency, I would choose a road flare over any other method. A chemical reaction that can get the most stubborn of wood going. It doesn't take up much usable room in a backpack, and will keep going even during a downpour.
 

Joker

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#6
Zippos are neat but i have to agree the good ol Bic is the way to go, i keep them everywhere.

Steel wool and a battery is just plain fun.
 

BMThiker

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Founding Member
#9
If there is threat of wet weather before or during a planned trip, I bring firestarter logs. The small ones are more convenient to pack, but the "strike" area never seems to work. And I've got a smattering of Bic's in various compartments of my gear.
 

Grumps

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#10
That thing looks like something Hilldweller eats for breakfast. Bic lighters are useless when wet (but I still carry those too). I have always carried a magnesium fire starter that you shave off chips with a knife and use the steel striker to ignite. You can use waxed cotton as a starter for kindling or you can bring an F150.

-Andy
 

Hilldweller

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#11
I've got all sorts of incendiary materials in our kit.
The magnesium block, fatwood, 6 or 8 lighters including one of those million-mile-an-hour types, lighter fluid, paraffin based wunderbars, Duraflame blocks, and even some strike-anywhere matches.
My wife is a pyro. Gotta feed her urges...

Used'ta have an F150. Used'ta.
 

Al Swope

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#12
My brother made me a firestater kit, actually just the fuel, not the spark. He cut strips of cardboard ~1.5 inches wide. He arranged them tightly (standing on edge) into a 9x11 tin caserole pan. He melted down a bunch of old candles and filled the pan covering the cardboard. Once it hardened, he cut them to the size of an expensive piece of cheese cake using a scroll saw. He used a food vaccum packager to seal each cake. The saturated cardboard acts like 100 little candles when you light it. It burns for a long time and starts wet twigs really well. I don't think he invented this but I couldn't find it online. I tried one for fun, they work great and are a good way to waste several hours on a winter day. I keep several in various places for emergencies.
 

TangoBlue

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Founding Member
#19
Lightweights. I've already paid for first the two years of Griffin's college education down the El Camino Real at Stanford.
 
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