Sleeping Bags, returning to tent camping chronicles

bob91yj

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Founding Member
#1
Bear with me...I'm older and slower than I was yesterday...the back story... My slide in truck camper has seen better days... beating it up and down the Baja peninsula a couple of times, testing it a bit beyond it's wood frame construction's limits a few hundred times over the years on various stateside trips, has taken it's toll. , Like @Dave, Machelle and I have gone back to our roots, to the tent thing. I screwed up on my first tent purchase and didn't get the model that I could stand up in, (Cabela's 4 man Alaskan Guide, should have bought the 6 man). Anyway, the tent design is impressive for my needs. I wanted a tent that I could use without the fly, but not have entire walls be just screen (remember the old thing...we use a porta-potti in the tent...you want to watch me do my thing..you still can, but you have to look through a roof panel, rather than a screen wall. It's a solid geodisic design, not tested with severe winds yet, but confident it will stand up to what I've experienced in my travels with previous tents.

Back to the original idea behind this thread...I have an assortment of used, crappy, worn out, cheap, sleeping bags.

Machelle and I usually sleep on individual cots in the tent. We're SoCal'ers, but we're old :cool:, real temperatures are probably upper '20's, in my head I want 0* bags. Here's the catch, I like the old school canvas/flannel style bags, don't give a damn how much it weighs/big it packs (I managed to fill up a 3/4 ton truck with crap for the Baja 400 last month...I'll figure out how to pack two more bags)!

Recommendations anyone? For those of you not keeping up with my ramblings (I'm sure I lost a few millennial's, intweb experts and assorted other's along the way)...looking for a canvas/flannel style 0* bag recommendations.
 

Greg

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Senior Staff
#2
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Al Swope

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Founding Member
#11
I just bought a Big Agnus Hog Park. It has a sleeve that holds the sleeping pad so you don't roll off. Very little insulation on the bottom because it's assumed you are on a pad. This allows for more insulation on top than a similar weight bag. These are cut super large. Easy to side sleep or rollover. I've been using for canoe trips. Best bag I've tried
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BlkWgn

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Senior Staff
Editor
Founding Member
#12
This is going to be the unpopular opinion here, but stay away from Teton bags, they are complete crap and you get what you pay for. While the fabric on the inside is soft and comfortable, they are nowhere near as warm as the claimed temperature ratings, the stitching is mediocre at best and the zippers stick and begin to fail almost from day one.

If you are looking for a budget bag in a similar price range of the Teton I would look into Blackpine Grizzly, we picked up the kids version for Hunter last year. For the price, it is well made and warm.

If you have a bit bigger budget it is hard to go wrong with Wiggys or Butler, both already mentioned here.
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#13
This is going to be the unpopular opinion here, but stay away from Teton bags, they are complete crap and you get what you pay for. While the fabric on the inside is soft and comfortable, they are nowhere near as warm as the claimed temperature ratings, the stitching is mediocre at best and the zippers stick and begin to fail almost from day one.

If you are looking for a budget bag in a similar price range of the Teton I would look into Blackpine Grizzly, we picked up the kids version for Hunter last year. For the price, it is well made and warm.

If you have a bit bigger budget it is hard to go wrong with Wiggys or Butler, both already mentioned here.
Fair enough. I've had the Teton since 2015 but I've also have a Wiggys and have been using both. Perhaps I haven't used the Teton enough to get it to this failure point. Was it just one bag or multiple that had a failure?
 
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