Hummer is back.

Dave

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#21
Electric is cool. All that available torque will be helpful to propel that brick shape down the road.

;)
 

Greg

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Senior Staff
#23
So the contestants are now:
  • Ford F-150 Electric Pickup
  • Rivian R1T
  • Atlis XT
  • Bollinger B2
  • GMC Hummer EV
  • Tesla Cybertruck
Enter Nikola Badger into the ring. This is a battery/hyrogen fuel cell hybrid ( e.g. Toyota Mirai ) with a claimed range of 600 miles.
nikola_badger.jpg

The problem with hydrogen fuel cell technology, even though the refueling process is much faster than electric, is that the infrastructure is non-existent. Here's Toyota's hydrogen fuel cell infrastructure in the US.
The problem with hfc.png
 
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Dave

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#24
That is a great looking truck, and 600 mile range is KILLER. But that infrastructure will take decades to catch up, I'm reminded of the old VHS vs BetaMax.... will the US go full EV or will it go hydrogen fuel cell infrastructure?

Gas, diesel, and now EV and HFC is quite a logistics cluster for supply and demand. I really think we're decades away from being weened off fossil fuels enough that the EV and/or HFC infrastructure will be feasible for overland travel.
 

Dave

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#26
But you can play Oregon Trail (it's energy.gov's travel corridor map for alternate fuels) in your EV though!

"The family and I wanted to head west and see Yellowstone in our Tesla but we were stranded out past Laramie. Grandma died of dysentery and we had to eat the kids."
Maybe that's the subtle, long term plan to corral us into the cities and their approved corridors for travel - "alternate fuel" availability once combustion engines are outlawed would put the back country firmly out of reach for mere mortals unless they escape the electric eye on foot.


;)

:tinfoil
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#27
That is a great looking truck, and 600 mile range is KILLER. But that infrastructure will take decades to catch up, I'm reminded of the old VHS vs BetaMax.... will the US go full EV or will it go hydrogen fuel cell infrastructure?

Gas, diesel, and now EV and HFC is quite a logistics cluster for supply and demand. I really think we're decades away from being weened off fossil fuels enough that the EV and/or HFC infrastructure will be feasible for overland travel.
Looking at the energy.gov's infrastructure map HFC is dead last.


Maybe that's the subtle, long term plan to corral us into the cities and their approved corridors for travel - "alternate fuel" availability once combustion engines are outlawed would put the back country firmly out of reach for mere mortals unless they escape the electric eye on foot.


;)

:tinfoil
Or carry 700 lbs. of solar panels :)
solar.png


:pirateship
 
#31
Well the UK just moved their Gas and Diesel New Car Sales Ban forward to 2035. Automakers have 15 years to get it figured out....I'm sure other countries will follow suit and then as the dates near there will be extensions, but it's coming. I didn't figure I'd see car sales moving to all electric in my lifetime but it might just happen...
Trust me...in 15 years, the OEM's will still be making gasoline and diesel engines. Perhaps they'll be hybridized, but they'll still be in use. Tesla has been trying to sell EV's for 10 years now. Other companies preceded them. EV's are still a tiny fraction of the market, mostly due to the limitations of EV technology (range, tow/payload performance, cold-weather longevity, recharge time, reliability, cost).

Cost has come down some and will continue to do so as economies of scale increase. The other factors have seen only so much improvement, and they have a long ways to go before EV's can truly replace internal combustion (or hybrid variants), especially in the 4x4 and truck segments.

I'm glad there are EV concept trucks and 4x4's out there...I'm not going to hold my breath for a reasonably-priced and reliable one to come to market any time soon. Plenty of hurdles for that technology to overcome. I can get in my gasoline 4x4 and drive through the remote parts of the northeast and Canada in the dead of winter on a whim...don't have to worry about where I'll find recharging stations or long wait times for recharge. Until I can safely and reliably do that with an EV, that technology isn't even an option worth my consideration (outside of daily drive commutes).
 
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