Hummer is back.

Super T

Adventurist
#9
Disclosure - I am a GM corporate employee and own a much maligned and hated H2 (people either love it or hate it - no in between) that I've absolutely beaten the slobber out of. It's been a great vehicle and I've loved it...fantastic off road and pretty good on pavement.

I think the GMC Hummer model (not a brand yet) has true potential. I Know the Hummer community is mostly autistic screeching about how this can't be good...and yes it does have some big shoes to fill. Yes there are questions regarding EV range and towing and recharge and cost and etc etc.

Give this a chance before passing judgement. There is some super cool tech coming out of this drive to solid EV's within the industry. It really is a fantastic time to be a car/truck enthusiast especially in the off road arena.



Second disclosure - my 2003 Hummer H2 is officially a garage queen/resto because of cost to maintain and not wanting to break it.
I drive a Power Wagon now....
 
#11
Well the UK just moved their Gas and Diesel New Car Sales Ban forward to 2035. Automakers have 15 years to get it figured out....I'm sure other countries will follow suit and then as the dates near there will be extensions, but it's coming. I didn't figure I'd see car sales moving to all electric in my lifetime but it might just happen...
 

Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#12
Well the UK just moved their Gas and Diesel New Car Sales Ban forward to 2035. Automakers have 15 years to get it figured out....I'm sure other countries will follow suit and then as the dates near there will be extensions, but it's coming. I didn't figure I'd see car sales moving to all electric in my lifetime but it might just happen...
Now we just need to figure out how to safely dispose of all the metric tons of these highly toxic batteries when they wear out... o_O
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#14
Now we just need to figure out how to safely dispose of all the metric tons of these highly toxic batteries when they wear out... o_O
There are processes that can recover about 90% to 100% of the material from lithium batteries. Currently it's just cheaper to mine new ore.

"Conditions for achieving a recovery of more than 90% Co and nearly 100% Li are achieved experimentally by varying the concentrations of leachant, time and temperature of the reaction as well as the starting solid-to-liquid ratio. "​

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S030438940901810X


Spent EV battery packs are being re-purposed as stationery power sources and there is an industry growing up around it.

"When, the automotive battery pack loses 20% (15% for certain EV models) of its initial capacity it becomes unfit for traction as the lower capacity of battery affects acceleration, range and regeneration capabilities of the vehicle."​
"Compared to use in EVs, stationary applications demand lower current density from the battery pack. Hence, batteries retaining between 80-85% of their original capacity are collected. Battery modules found to have similar power and life are sorted out and re-assembled in new “repurposed” battery packs, ready for stationary usage, such as utility-scale grid, building and telecommunication tower storage."​

Amsterdam's Johan Cruyff Arena is an example. It uses a mix of spent and new EV batteries to store energy at off-peak costs and from solar for events.

"Now the PV energy generated during the day, rather than being fed into the grid and sold to the grid operator at low price, goes to charge the 2.8 MWh battery pack whose nominal capacity was chosen to meet the energy demand from the stadium loads for 1 h during the most important events with maximum power absorption; and for 3 h when accessory services such as catering are not in use"​

China is using them for telecom towers.

"Similarly, in China the world's biggest operator of telecommunication towers, since 2018 ended purchase of lead-acid batteries. All existing and rapidly ageing lead-acid batteries currently installed for back-up power at 98% of its 2 million telecom tower base stations (54 GWh battery storage demand) will be replaced by second-life LIBs. Partnership agreements were signed with more than 16 EV and battery manufacturers, as second-life LIBs in 2018 were reported to be priced at less than $100/kWh, namely the same price of new lead-acid batteries."​

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6582158/
 
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