Could an all electric pick up truck be in our future?

richard310

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#2
If they revert back to the simplicity of what a truck should be, redesign the aesthetics cuz damn those are some ugly rigs, drop that ridiculous price point, incorporate effective solar panels.... and you may, just may have my interest.

Less is more, especially since the entire vehicle is now using electricity, vs combustion engine/electrical accessories.
 

Dave

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#3
Less is more, especially since the entire vehicle is now using electricity, vs combustion engine/electrical accessories.
This. Seems like with an all electric vehicle you have a great opportunity to evolve the idea of a truck, to make it super lightweight and simple.
 

smlobx

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#5
Here's a FLT review of the Atlis. Pay attention to the range, ground clearance and price...


Of course we'll have to wait and see but the theoritical possibilities are very interesting..
 

TangoBlue

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#6
Interesting. If the battery capacity, range, and price is acceptable we could be looking at a true revolution in OHV tecnology.
 

bob91yj

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#7
I've
I agree, simplify the darn things. Unfortunately I don't think we'll see that, but the opposite instead.

I want this:

View attachment 43196

with an independently controlled electric motor at each wheel, solar charging and a long lasting battery. That's it.
I've been envious of that truck since the first time I saw it on the interwebs years ago!
 

Dave

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#8
Looks heavy but I guess it’s a trade off. A 300 mile range is pretty good actually but I wonder how 4LO trail work would affect that range.

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I’m really digging the idea of the front trunk.

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#9
I read the article in Truck Camper, and watched the video above. I noticed that neither of them talked about heating and cooling, and how much energy THAT'S going to suck out of the battery bank.

I live in upstate NY, and before I retired, it was not uncommon to drive to work in sub-zero temperatures in the winter. Anybody here want to drive around Death Valley in a truck without air conditioning? How much range will be left after you allow for THAT power usage?

Finally, the chicken and egg problem. Who's going to invest a gazillion dollars into a nationwide network of charging stations? Upgrade the electrical grid as needed to get power to all of them? Do the electric utilities even have enough generating capacity to support this? (We have brownouts in the summer now.) Will we (the taxpayers) wind up paying for all that?

Not to say it's bullshit, but it all does seem excessively optimistic to me.
 

TangoBlue

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#10
All valid concerns, but like all new technologies, just like the emergence of the internal combustion engine, it's this sort of innovation that drives the industry and engineering to new levels.

I'm excited to see these attempts at "building a better mouse trap"!
 
#11
All valid concerns, but like all new technologies, just like the emergence of the internal combustion engine, it's this sort of innovation that drives the industry and engineering to new levels.
I get that. I really do. Sometimes new technology comes along and just changes the entire freaking world. Railroads, Electricity, the Internal Combustion Engine, Satellites, Cellular Phones . . .

But sometimes a new technology comes along that is hyped beyond any reasonable level by the fan-boys, but for various reasons, never really has a chance. Dirigible Airships, for instance.

I remember reading that when nuclear reactors were first proposed for generating electricity, the claim was made that it would "make electricity so cheap that we wouldn't bother to meter it!" and "all our roads and highways would have electric heating wires built in to melt the snow and ice off".

Gotta take the fan-boys with a grain of salt.
 

Greg

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#17
I remember reading that when nuclear reactors were first proposed for generating electricity, the claim was made that it would "make electricity so cheap that we wouldn't bother to meter it!" and "all our roads and highways would have electric heating wires built in to melt the snow and ice off".

Gotta take the fan-boys with a grain of salt.
NRC regulation cost for licensing killed that. Not the technology. North Anna in central Virginia has 2 units. The original plan was 4. Units 3 and 4 were near completion but the cost of compliance was so high that they were scrapped.

Some numbers.

Units 1 and 2 at North Anna and the 2 units in Surrey VA run at 100% all the time and act as the grids base. They have scheduled down time every 18 months replacing 1/3 of their spent fuel. When I worked there those 4 units provided power to %40 of Dominion Power's grid and each unit was just under 1000 megawatts output.
 

TangoBlue

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#18
NRC regulation cost for licensing killed that. Not the technology. North Anna in central Virginia has 2 units. The original plan was 4. Units 3 and 4 were near completion but the cost of compliance was so high that they were scrapped.

Some numbers.

Units 1 and 2 at North Anna and the 2 units in Surrey VA run at 100% all the time and act as the grids base. They have scheduled down time every 18 months replacing 1/3 of their spent fuel. When I worked there those 4 units provided power to %40 of Dominion Power's grid and each unit was just under 1000 megawatts output.
It seems France has a pretty successful nuclear power generation program, even though it's state controlled and costs are not disseminated. France is ninth in the world as a producer of electricity but number 2 in electric production by nuclear energy. Over 73% of it's electricity comes from fission and 10% from fossil fuels; the other percentages are the combination from wind, solar, and hydroelectric.

Conversely, in the US the last two power plants to be built in the US were the Watts Bar plant in TN, which began construction in 1973, was completed in 1990, and didn't begin commercial operation until 1996, and the River Bend plant in LA, which was built in 1977 and went online in 1986. Since then, commencing 2010 construction, there were two new reactors under construction (TN and SC), while 34 reactors have been permanently shut down. As of last year they ceased construction of the SC reactor and construction continues in TN. The US is the worlds largest producer of electricity by nuclear power, resulting in 33% of global electricity production by fission. As this decline in plant production continues available energy decreases driving up costs and resulting in increased reliance upon new production fossil fuel plants or other less reliable means of energy production.

From a climate change/global warming/GHG emissions source, nuclear power ranks third behind hydroelectric and wind power.

Politics, public opinion, and emotion are the biggest influencers to "new" nuclear energy in the US. As we create more demand for electrical energy, I have to ask, just where the hell is it going to come from from?
 

Robert

Adventurist
#19
You want to talk about a sore subject in SC- the corruption with the SC reactor is an on-going mess that needs to see some people swinging from gallows, or at least sitting in jail stripped of their pensions, retirement, bonuses, etc.

When electric vehicles get good ranges and can be quickly recharged then I may be interested. Those are of my two sticking points plus there is something sterile about electric cars that just leaves me wanting. I think I really thought about it watching one of the electric formula car races a while back, they sound like the slot cars we played with as kids. I want my race cars to sound like race cars; I don't want to just hear them though, I want to feel them- I want it to be a visceral experience. I love the sound of mechanical parts whining, straining, sometimes failing. The only thing worse would be going to watch some vintage warbirds fly by only to find they'd been converted to electric.

 

TangoBlue

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#20
You want to talk about a sore subject in SC- the corruption with the SC reactor is an on-going mess that needs to see some people swinging from gallows, or at least sitting in jail stripped of their pensions, retirement, bonuses, etc.

When electric vehicles get good ranges and can be quickly recharged then I may be interested. Those are of my two sticking points plus there is something sterile about electric cars that just leaves me wanting. I think I really thought about it watching one of the electric formula car races a while back, they sound like the slot cars we played with as kids. I want my race cars to sound like race cars; I don't want to just hear them though, I want to feel them- I want it to be a visceral experience. I love the sound of mechanical parts whining, straining, sometimes failing. The only thing worse would be going to watch some vintage warbirds fly by only to find they'd been converted to electric.

Now, all we have to do is share your reply with entrepreneurs, product developers, financiers, technologists, scientists, manufacturers, and businesses. After they read that it should convince them to stop what they're doing. :rofl.

I can relate to your feelings but don't you think that "horse is out of the barn"?
 
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