CALIFORNIA

bob91yj

Adventurist
Founding Member
#28
If you're planning on the Big Bear area in the next week or so, you may want to reconsider.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-san-bernardino-mountains-fire-20170620-story.html

Can't stress fire prevention in the CA back country enough. We had a wet winter, which helped the drought, but it also got the weeds growing taller and more abundant. This weeks heat wave is turning them all in to tinder. Expect fire restrictions if you do go, at times that will include charcoal. Propane stoves only, even then, you'll need a fire permit.
 

Zam15

Adventurist
#29
Yay, time to sit around a battery powered lantern "campfire" again :oops:

Its amazing how much you miss a campfire when you can't have one.. Also off-road fire trucks driving by camp all the time.
 
#30
If you're planning on the Big Bear area in the next week or so, you may want to reconsider.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-san-bernardino-mountains-fire-20170620-story.html

Can't stress fire prevention in the CA back country enough. We had a wet winter, which helped the drought, but it also got the weeds growing taller and more abundant. This weeks heat wave is turning them all in to tinder. Expect fire restrictions if you do go, at times that will include charcoal. Propane stoves only, even then, you'll need a fire permit.
We went up to Big Bear and ran Holcomb Creek yesterday. On the way up I saw a lot of USFS trucks headed back down the mountain. I didn't see any smoke anywhere in the distance to the east of the trail and the air quality was great so I'm hoping it's under control. One of the guys I was with said they lifted all the roadway restrictions. We have an adopt a trail up there and haven't seen any open fire restrictions pop up on the AAT website from the rangers there yet other than the permits, approved fire rings etc yet.
 

bob91yj

Adventurist
Founding Member
#31
I can't imagine them not setting fire restrictions after this recent heat wave. Even without restrictions, I don't know that I'd take a chance with a campfire. It's too easy for a gust of wind to kick up, spread a few embers... Not to mention the state of California has started sending the bill to people they blame for starting the fire.

I'm not sure what one does when the mailman delivers a bill for $10,000,000 to put out a large forest fire. Start laughing, tell the mailman to hang on a second while you write the check to send back to them.:confused:
 
#32
I can't imagine them not setting fire restrictions after this recent heat wave. Even without restrictions, I don't know that I'd take a chance with a campfire. It's too easy for a gust of wind to kick up, spread a few embers... Not to mention the state of California has started sending the bill to people they blame for starting the fire.

I'm not sure what one does when the mailman delivers a bill for $10,000,000 to put out a large forest fire. Start laughing, tell the mailman to hang on a second while you write the check to send back to them.:confused:
Bankruptcy court.
 
#33
Here is the latest and greatest I just got in my mailbox for San Bernardino/BigBear=
Here it is hot off the press:

San Bernardino National Forest Increases Fire Restrictions

SAN BERNARDINO, California, June 26, 2017 – The San Bernardino National Forest will increase the current seasonal fire restrictions effective Saturday, July 1, 2017.

Hot, dry and windy conditions along with critically dry and receptive fuel types throughout the San Bernardino National Forest have prompted local fire mangers to implement additional fire restrictions. The restrictions are designed to prevent accidental wildfires, these restrictions will affect additional recreation sites and become more restrictive in areas already in restrictions.

The fire restrictions that are effective on all San Bernardino National Forest lands are as follows:
•Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within the areas listed in Exhibits A, B, and C (exhibits attached).
•Smoking is prohibited, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or in the areas listed in exhibits A, B, and C.

· Persons with a valid California Campfire Permit are not exempt from the prohibitions listed above, however, persons with a valid California Campfire Permit may use a portable contained-gas or liquefied-petroleum stove or lantern with a fuel shut-off valve.
•Welding, or operating acetylene or other torch with open flame is prohibited.
•An approved spark arrester is required for all off-highway vehicles.

Fire Management Officer Jaime Gamboa said that everyone can play a role in keeping our community safe. “The community and all forest users can help in the prevention of fires by being careful when using your public lands and by remaining vigilant in reporting illegal and inappropriate behaviors within the forest and our community.”

The US Forest Service will be aggressively citing those who do not comply with the posted restrictions. Violation of these prohibitions is subject to punishment by a fine of not more than $10,000 or imprisonment for not more than six months or both, as Class B misdemeanors under federal law. Persons may also be responsible for resource damage, suppression costs and any injuries that occur if they are found liable for causing a wildfire.

Forest visitors are encouraged to “Know Before You Go” and call ahead to the local Ranger Station to check on location conditions and restrictions at the following offices:

San Bernardino National Forest Supervisor’s Office

602 S. Tippecanoe Ave., San Bernardino

(909) 382-2600



Big Bear Discovery Center

41397 North Shore Drive / Highway 38, Fawnskin

(909) 382-2790



San Jacinto Ranger Station

54270 Pine Crest, Idyllwild

(909) 382-2922



Front Country Ranger Station

1209 Lytle Creek Road, Lytle Creek

(909) 382-2851



Mill Creek Visitor Center

34701 Mill Creek Road, Mentone

(909) 382-2881



Santa Rosa & San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Visitor Center

51-500 Highway 74 Palm Desert

(760) 862-9984
 

bob91yj

Adventurist
Founding Member
#37
Hwy 1, Big Sur closure update...

http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/08/02/big-sur-caltrans-plans-new-roadway-over-mud-creek-slide/

Big Sur – The landslide that buried a large swath of Highway 1 on the Big Sur coast in May will be the ground on which a new roadway is built.

Big Sur: Parts of Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park to reopen
Caltrans released plans on Tuesday detailing its initial strategy to expedite the rebuilding and reopening of Highway 1 at Mud Creek, calling for the roadway to be realigned across the landslide.


Jim Shivers, Caltrans spokesperson, said that the agency’s “very experienced team” of geotechnical and engineering personnel have studied the radar assessments and other data to find the correct path to replacing the section of Highway 1 at the slide site.

“This is a very huge undertaking,” said Shivers.

A timeline for construction-through-reopening of the roadway, and anticipated cost details are expected by the end of August, according to Caltrans.

Besides realigning the new roadway across the slide, it will be buttressed with a series of embankments, berms, rocks, netting, culverts and other stabilizing materials according to department engineers and geologists.

“Our staff has been working hard to tackle the weather-related challenges faced by Highway 1,” said Malcolm Dougherty, Caltrans director, in a press release. “We have made tremendous progress on Pfeiffer Canyon, have opened Paul’s Slide, and now we have good news on the slide at Mud Creek. Our goal is to reconnect the areas impacted by the winter storms as quickly and safely as possible.”

Caltrans sent its initial roadway rebuilding plan to various state, local and federal resource agencies last week and will continue to work closely with them and the Big Sur community until the highway is reopened.

When the Mud Creek slide occurred on May 20, about nine miles north of the San Luis Obispo/Monterey county line, it reshaped the California coastline by dumping slide material 600 feet out into the Pacific Ocean, creating 15 acres of new land, making it the largest slide ever along the Big Sur coast.

In the process, a quarter-mile section of Highway 1 was buried under rock and dirt. A total of about 75 acres of land was displaced, including the 15 acres out to sea or 2.4 million yards of slide debris weighing about 4.2 million tons.

According to Caltrans, the plan’s strategy will allow it to rebuild the roadway more quickly and at a lower cost than other alternatives such as structures, a tunnel or major earthwork that places additional fill into the ocean.

“This plan is a win-win for the hard-hit Big Sur community and this pristine coastal environment,” said Tim Gubbins, Caltrans District 5 director. “Our emergency contractor continues working dawn to dusk every day and will continue until we can safely reopen the highway.”

Shivers said John Madonna Construction is the contractor on the Mud Creek slide project.

James Herrera can be reached at 831-726-4344.
 

BlkWgn

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Founding Member
#40
Some great news on a miracle happening on a couple of popular SoCal trails from the SBNF Adopt-A-Trail. Not only has existing trail been saved, but a new trail designation protecting them has been approved.

Hello Adopt-a-Trail Volunteers!

After 20 years of trying, I finally accomplished something really important for Off-Roaders.

Working with the Forest Engineering Department, some 4x4 routes will finally become legal and preserved for our generation and those ahead.

The first accomplishment is all of the bypass routes up on Pilot Rock Ridge. Next area, all of the remaining bypasses up on Cleghorn Ridge.

Funny thing, these routes will not be classified as roads. Rather, a new classification will be used on future maps and reference points. Since these bypasses don’t have standard level II road improvements (metal drains, lead-out ditches etc.) and exceed standard slope limits, the forest will classify them as full width (Jeep/OHV) trails.

So, good news after all. We can all be proud to have these additional miles of motorized access added to the forest transportation plan!

Special thanks to the Adopt-a-Trail Clubs that have maintained these routes for some many years! (Lost Jeeps, NAXJA and Drifters 4x4 clubs).
Thank you all for your support of our Forest Adopt-a-Trail Program. YOU DO MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE!!!!
Anyone who is familiar with these trails or the politics involved with trails in California will understand just how big of a deal this is.
 
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