Bubba Rope Vs. Yankum Rope

wesel123

Adventurist
Founding Member
#1
Hey all,

I have been using a 7/8' Bubba rope for a few years now and I finally managed to damage it a few weeks ago in Anza pulling some folks out of the mud (I'm leaning to never go off trail with anyone whom does NOT have recovery point on their rigs). I love the kinetic recovery ropes and want to replace it, but with other options out there has anyone used Yamkum? Only reason I'm looking to change is the Yankum rope thickness is 1-1/2" (piece of mind) for a 26000 pull and the they have a protective sleeve that you can use in the middle to cut a 30' rope down to 15' rope for tight pulls.

Price is also an issue. The Bubba is $209 and the Yamkum is on sale for $458 (ouch)

Any thoughts on either one?

This is the Bubba rope I have used for years:
https://www.bubbarope.com/jeeps-and-trucks/bubba-rope-30-foot

Equivalent Yankum
https://yankum.com/cobra
 

wesel123

Adventurist
Founding Member
#5
Thanks Dean. Like like the option of a u.s. made road. I'm going to order one tonight. I'm assuming you had good luck with it?
 
#6

Dave

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Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#9
Buy the kinetic rope rated for your vehicle, the vehicles you generally wheel with. 1 1/2" is to large even for a Power Wagon. What is the 1 1/2" K rope rated for?

You want the K rope to stretch. This is what we use along with Safe Xtrac K rope.

http://www.masterpull.com/7-8-super-yanker-kinetic-recovery-rope-28-500-lbs/

http://www.masterpull.com/1-super-yanker-kinetic-recovery-rope-33-500-lbs/

http://www.asroffroad.com/sx-20000d-7-8-x-20-kinetic-recovery-rope/
Agreed. Any of these 3 will do the trick.

Ian what is your primary rig these days?
 

wesel123

Adventurist
Founding Member
#11
Hey Dave,

My 200 is now strictly the wife/mommy mobile. Sold our 5th Gen Runner and I picked up an 18 Power Wagon. I know you and I talked about this last year, as much as I wanted the Cummins I love, and I mean LOVE this truck.

The 6.4l tows my 21ft. Outdoors Rv trailer without a hitch.

As my youngest girl is now 16 months old we travel with the trailer base camp and explore. But as she gets older there is a FWC Project M/Topper in my future. Lol....I don't want her "spoiled".....hahahaha.

So basically I have been rebuilding my recovery equipment to suit the bigger truck. Just picked up the new Warn Epic Heavy Duty kit, a few Crosby 6.5 ton Shackles and some new max trax soon.

Next major ok purchase will be a jack of some sort. Like the X-jack, safe jack set up or the sweet ARB jack.
 
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Dave

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#14
...snip... I picked up an 18 Power Wagon...

...snip... So basically I have been rebuilding my recovery equipment to suit the bigger truck. Just picked up the new Warn Epic Heavy Duty kit, a few Crosby 6.5 ton Shackles and some new max trax soon.

Next major ok purchase will be a jack of some sort. Like the X-jack, safe jack set up or the sweet ARB jack.
Just a suggestion, but if I were in the market for a FULL recovery kit with EVERYTHING you need in one bag for a Power Wagon/full size pickup, I would look long and hard at the Safe-X-Tract kit that is purpose built for this role.

This is what I carry, and the beauty of this is that you have one recovery bag that's equipped to handle any potentially required recovery technique - it even comes with a laminated card that makes each technique bonehead-proof. Yes, it's expensive but as I always say, buy once, cry once.

(not a paid shill, but I really BELIEVE in this brand and what it stands for)

SX-20000_sheet_B__72135.1576969917.1280.1280.jpg
 

wesel123

Adventurist
Founding Member
#16
The Safe-X-Tract is a great kit, it would be better to piece that together. I won't be able to use the winch line, I have the factory roller fair-leads and no one has quite figured out how to switch to a hawes.
 
#17
The Safe-X-Tract is a great kit, it would be better to piece that together. I won't be able to use the winch line, I have the factory roller fair-leads and no one has quite figured out how to switch to a hawes.
Use the roller with synthetic. There is no issues with that as long as the rollers are not chewed up from cable. The rollers are far more efficient and easier on the rope than a Hawse.
 

wesel123

Adventurist
Founding Member
#18
I thought they get pinched in the corners? I'm assuming there are no burrs on the rollers as I have yet to use the winch, unless some rocks or debris hit them. But they are pretty well protected being behind the bumper.
 
#19
I thought they get pinched in the corners? I'm assuming there are no burrs on the rollers as I have yet to use the winch, unless some rocks or debris hit them. But they are pretty well protected being behind the bumper.
They should not with a decent fairlead. Maybe in some super wild really bad pull direction, but the vertical rollers should be just inside the horizontal. Not really a pinch point.
 

Dave

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Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#20
The whole "pinching in the corners" thing may happen in a bad side pull one-in-a-million case where the operator is not paying proper attention, but the overall myth has been proven to be wrong several times.

If your fair lead is NEW (or new-ish) with no burrs or other defects, a synthetic line is perfectly fine on a steel roller.
 
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