A bag is a bag, or is it?

#1
Two years ago I met Will Macia of Last US Bag at the Northwest Overland Rally in Plain Washington. He was there to sell his gear to the greater overland community at large. While reviewing his products two things clearly stuck out, design and quality. Having a busy training schedule during the Rally didn’t afford me much time for shopping and the Rally had ended by the time I could make it back to his booth to make a purchase.



Fast forward 6 months my day job was in need of a custom F.O.D. barrier (debris catch all) for aircraft overhaul purposes. I immediately thought of Will and Last US Bag. After a few email exchanges and meetings Will was in production of the prototype and the rest is history.



During that time I expressed that we (two of the Three Amigos) were heading to Namibia Africa for a 2 week overland trip and that we would be interested in using some of his bags for our trip. We had a training scheduled in the Vancouver WA area and made the visit to his facility. I highly recommend checking out the high tech sewing operation Will has, impressive to say the least!



We needed organization for our trip to Namibia as you can only bring so much when traveling by air and we needed to be efficient.


The first item is the Canteen Nutsack. I used this to consolidate my tire repair kit from its roto molded case. It’s made of 1000d Cordura and utilizes YKK zippers has a hook and loop top closure. The stitching is durable and the bags have MOLLE webbing on them if you wanted to thread one to a compatible backpack. Inside there are numerous small sleeved pockets for individual items. These bags worked so well for this purpose that I now have 4 of them each serving a specific use and placement throughout my vehicle for quick access.

LSUB 1.jpg LSUB 2.jpg LSUB 3.jpg LSUB 4.jpg LSUB 5.jpg



 
#2
For travel documents, power cords, tablet, electronics transport and even a sweater for a chilly flight the Happy Camper Organizer is the ticket! I dubbed it my man purse for the Namibia trip as it held all of our important documents and much more! It lived on the floor of the aircraft and more often than not ended up on the floor of the Land Cruiser. Again made from 1000d Cordura with YKK zippers this thing can take a beating!​

On the exterior there are 5 pockets with sturdy D rings for suspending the bag along with an adjustable carry strap. When folded open the two large internal pockets are exposed. This is where if packed efficiently you could get away with an overnight change of clothes. With hook and loop label attachment you could use this bag for many purposes such as a tool bag, first aid kit or my use, a man purse. I rarely travel without the Happy Camper.


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#3
Our rental Land Cruisers came with basic recovery equipment but we knew we wanted to bring a few items of our own gear and needed a big durable duffel to haul it in.​

Not listed on the website but available through special order (contact Will) is the LSUB 124 Endurance bag set. This bag set is made of heavy duty Cordura but has a special lining of copper to help manage moister, mold and corrosion of recovery gear such as screw pin bow shackles, X lock and pulley blocks. The set consists of one large duffel, two smaller ones that fit inside and a third sleeve type bag. All nested to fit snug. They are basic rectangular is shape and don’t have internal or external pockets. I have found this to be a better recovery equipment bag as I prefer to open just one lid and find what I need versus looking in individual pockets.​

Inside the two smaller duffels we managed to fit the contents of a Safe Xtract recovery kit (20’ kinetic rope, X lock, two winch line locks, soft shackles, pulley block an 30’ winch line extension), and tire repair kit. All of this was then stuffed into the larger duffel along with a Deadman Offroad ground anchor. That’s a bunch gear of that we sent checked baggage!​

We all know how airlines treat bags let alone traveling from Seattle, London, Johannesburg, Windhoek and back including riding around in the bed of a Land Cruiser for two weeks in country! If that isn’t a test of durability that I don’t know what is?




LUSB #1.jpg LUSB #2.jpg LSUB 6.jpg LSUB 15.jpg LSUB 13.jpg LSUB 14.jpg




Since returning from Namibia I have used the various LSUB listed in this review for domestic trail travel and a few trips to Canada for the past year. I can attest to the durability and quality of them and highly recommend them to add to your kit organization.​


So is a bag just a bag? For me it’s a tool and key to organization.​






Review and photos by Mike Block of https://www.threeamigosoffroad.com/

Last US Bag https://lastusbag.com/

NOTE: These bags were provided to the reviewer at no cost for testing and review purposes.​
 
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Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#5
A bag is a bag, until it craps out, then it's a drag. A broken strap or blown out zipper can ruin your entire system of organization.

Looks like well thought out, quality gear. Thanks for the review.
x2

I’m a big fan of soft bags for things. Easy on the interior of your rig, easy on the contents, and easy to drag out when you need that certain something.

Last US Bag is killing it! :thumbsup
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#6
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I just picked up a few of these bags. Each a different color. I've got similar bags and even though they're labeled they. are. all. the. same. color. So I end up picking through multiple bags reading labels to find what I need.

@lastusbag They could use some loop fabric on them just in case I start doubling up on colors and color swaps from meaning the contents to category of contents.
 
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#7
View attachment 53190

I just picked up a few of these bags. Each a different color. I've got similar bags and even though they're labeled they. are. all. the. same. color. So I end up picking through multiple bags reading labels to find what I need.

They could use some loop fabric on them just in case I start doubling up on colors and color swaps from meaning the contents to category of contents.

Perhaps send Will an email, put a bug in his ear about the Velcro.
 

Herbie

Adventurist
#8
I’m a big fan of soft bags for things. Easy on the interior of your rig, easy on the contents, and easy to drag out when you need that certain something.
Generally lighter, too. As I went through the build out inside my van, my original plan was to copy the Expo/Volkswagen Westy plan - drawers, closet, cabinets, etc. When it came down to it, I've opted for softer/lighter storage at almost every stage. Drawers replaced with either plastic crates or soft luggage with stiffeners sewn in. Closet replaced with netting and soft-side items, etc.
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
#9
Generally lighter, too. As I went through the build out inside my van, my original plan was to copy the Expo/Volkswagen Westy plan - drawers, closet, cabinets, etc. When it came down to it, I've opted for softer/lighter storage at almost every stage. Drawers replaced with either plastic crates or soft luggage with stiffeners sewn in. Closet replaced with netting and soft-side items, etc.
This concept intrigues me.
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#12
Generally lighter, too. As I went through the build out inside my van, my original plan was to copy the Expo/Volkswagen Westy plan - drawers, closet, cabinets, etc. When it came down to it, I've opted for softer/lighter storage at almost every stage. Drawers replaced with either plastic crates or soft luggage with stiffeners sewn in. Closet replaced with netting and soft-side items, etc.
On my GX build I did a combination of this. I still wanted a locking drawer for tools and firearms. Using bags a Front Runner Wolfpack boxes as well.
 

smlobx

Adventurist
#13
Great write up. I’m always looking for a piece of durable kit.

Just an FYI if your travels ever take you back to Namibia. Consider going through Frankfurt instead of London. As you know there is a strong German influence in Namibia and there are numerous flight options that will take you directly to Windhoek so your flight time will be a shorter and will cost less. (Ours did).
 
#14
Great write up. I’m always looking for a piece of durable kit.

Just an FYI if your travels ever take you back to Namibia. Consider going through Frankfurt instead of London. As you know there is a strong German influence in Namibia and there are numerous flight options that will take you directly to Windhoek so your flight time will be a shorter and will cost less. (Ours did).
Thanks!

The price was right going through London, plus a layover of 9 hours allowed for a hotel nap. Coming back was another story. Brutal, layovers of 3-4 hours not long enough to get a hotel.
 
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