2003 Tundra

#41
Yes. Changing fuel quality (variable octane) is what the computer is sensing and trying to compensate for, thus throwing CEL's. One of the 3 reasons I did not want to go Toyota V8 when doing the engine swap. This may even be showing codes for the O2 sensors as well because of the erratic burn conditions. Stick with high octane and you may very well see the codes eventually clear themselves after a few consistent performance drive cycles.
Thank you brother. I will give it a try and report back. To be honest, I love the 4.7 in this platform... Crazy power to me (coming from the jeep world for the most part) and we have "plans" :) to keep this thing for a long time... so I am going to follow your advice and try it. 93 otane 24/7 here we come and we'll see what happens. Small investment in the big picture.
 

bob91yj

Adventurist
Founding Member
#42
I disagree with your neighbor. Not sure on your vehicle but if it is a Bank XX, Sensor 1, then it will affect the engine performance. If it is Bank XX sensor 2 it is only monitoring the cat converter efficiency and not that big of a deal.

Your engine ECM has two modes, closed loop and open loop. In open loop the ECM uses pre-set engine parameters to determine fuel/air mixture among other things. Once everything is up to temperature it goes to a closed loop mode where it is using actual sensor parameters to determine fuel/air mixture. With a failed sensor 1, the engine is always using the preset engine parameters rather than adjusting for actual values.
 

TangoBlue

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Founding Member
#43
Thank you brother. I will give it a try and report back. To be honest, I love the 4.7 in this platform... Crazy power to me (coming from the jeep world for the most part) and we have "plans" :) to keep this thing for a long time... so I am going to follow your advice and try it. 93 otane 24/7 here we come and we'll see what happens. Small investment in the big picture.
Worth a shot... the 4.7 is a great motor. The marine version (no relation :D) is even better... no ECM!
 
#44
I disagree with your neighbor. Not sure on your vehicle but if it is a Bank XX, Sensor 1, then it will affect the engine performance. If it is Bank XX sensor 2 it is only monitoring the cat converter efficiency and not that big of a deal.

Your engine ECM has two modes, closed loop and open loop. In open loop the ECM uses pre-set engine parameters to determine fuel/air mixture among other things. Once everything is up to temperature it goes to a closed loop mode where it is using actual sensor parameters to determine fuel/air mixture. With a failed sensor 1, the engine is always using the preset engine parameters rather than adjusting for actual values.
Awesome info. I will check which sensor it is later this morning. Thanks Bob!
 

Trump

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Founding Member
#45
Worth a shot... the 4.7 is a great motor. The marine version (no relation :D) is even better... no ECM!
Sweet baby Jebuzz! I had no idea such a thing existed. An ECM free 2UZ, sure would like to drop that in the Tacoma. I'd only need to take it back out every time I did emissions testing and have what... $20K to burn on it?
 

TangoBlue

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Founding Member
#46
Sweet baby Jebuzz! I had no idea such a thing existed. An ECM free 2UZ, sure would like to drop that in the Tacoma. I'd only need to take it back out every time I did emissions testing and have what... $20K to burn on it?
Well, it depends on where you live. In VA the replacement motor has to be dated later than the year of the recipient vehicle. In my case, a 2002 Tahoe LM7 motor, the last year for mechanical throttle linkage. "Drive-by" emission testing on that motor, on what they thought was the original 4-cylinder 3RZ-FE engine, was actually within the parameters for that originally configured truck. Go figure.

Also, within some states, certain counties require emission testing and others don't. Here in occupied Northern Virginia it is required, but in the neighboring counties south of where I live it is not. Another example, I understand that to be true of Oregon as well from my research.

Those motors are hard to come by. The guy I know who did it for his FJ40 had 2 new crate marine motors, but he was a Lexus engineer with "connections".
 
#49
So... now onto the front... Had some help in the form of the Joe. Really hate the difference between a Toyota bumper assembly and a Jeep but we are gonna make it work. Not done by any stretch but by using some steel I had in the pile and an old winch plate I think we can come up with something strong enough for a winch and that does not look too bad... although that is the least of my worries. That last photo is the gist of what is going to happen... still working on the design though. front bumper 1.JPG front bumper 2.JPG front bumper 3.JPG front bumper 4.JPG
 
#50
Well... Lookie here. This little Tundra just towed his little brother, a 1996 base model 4wd, 4 spd, 4 cylinder, home from Richmond, VA. Ole Tundra handled it fine, that is up to about 60mph :). More to come on this little truck. I think he will be stock for a while and then we'll see what happens.
Truck pulling Truck.JPG
 
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