The First Aid Kit Thread

TangoBlue

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Founding Member
#62
Hey at least we haven't started wearing their clothing line...
@ Dave - Seriously, have you seen that gear... Nihon-hipster-chic on steroids. o_O

I know this person and I don't want to reveal any names (since he is a member here who is an Active Duty USMC Master Sergeant that lives in Frickin, NC) so keep it on the down-low. :cool:

Anyway, he claims he got some clothing from Snow Peak on clearance (like we believe that) and that it isn't just some, "Paris fashion show crap"; we all nod our heads politely out of respect... but how do you break it to this poor guy that he looks like some Gaijin-refugee from a Japanese Manga comic in those Anime-inspired togs? :confused:

But besides this poor fellow, completely unrelated, but AAV Member @Yuman Desert Rat makes a dandy go-to bag that I've nicknamed, "doody bag", that would be a great FAK which could be easily suspended from the back of your car seat head rest.

That's where I have my primary vehicle FAK. From the drivers seat, reach over to the passenger seat, Click 2 FASTEX buckles, and it's a mobile kit.
 
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Herbie

Adventurist
#64
Short of a mas casualty, there's actually quite a bit in that kit. I think it's sized "just right" since I don't want to carry an entire Paramedic style bag. YMMV.
Yeah, it's probably close. I just have a couple of specific items that eat a lot of room. Of course, with the MOLLE web, maybe I could just add it outside...
 
#65
@ Dave - Seriously, have you seen that gear... Nihon-hipster-chic on steroids. o_O

I know this person and I don't want to reveal any names (since he is a member here who is an Active Duty USMC Master Sergeant that lives in Frickin, NC) so keep it on the down-low. :cool:

Anyway, he claims he got some clothing from Snow Peak on clearance (like we believe that) and that it isn't just some, "Paris fashion show crap"; we all nod our heads politely out of respect... but how do you break it to this poor guy that he looks like some Gaijin-refugee from a Japanese Manga comic in those Anime-inspired togs? :confused:

But besides this poor fellow, completely unrelated, but AAV Member @Yuman Desert Rat makes a dandy go-to bag that I've nicknamed, "doody bag", that would be a great FAK which could be easily suspended from the back of your car seat head rest.

That's where I have my primary vehicle FAK. From the drivers seat, reach over to the passenger seat, Click 2 FASTEX buckles, and it's a mobile kit.
Why do I need a dictionary to figure out what you write???????
 
#66
I'm still on the hunt for an (empty) FAK bag so I can build up my own kit. Most empty bags sold online are cheap and flimsy. This looks like a good choice, but MyMedic has only the one photo on their site. Any chance you could rip yours open and snap a few more photos for the class?

Thanks!
Depending how big of a bag you want...

I use a backpack style bag from True North for my trauma kit - https://www.truenorthgear.com/catalog/products/packs/firefly-medic-gen-2

It is plenty big and quite sturdy/durable. I chose a backpack style thinking if there is any distance to walk to the victim(s), especially if it is down a narrow trail alongside parked trucks, I wanted both hands free for balance and grabbing on things.

This one is a newer version than mine (mine is red) but looks to be the same overall design.
 
#70
I say keep it simple, direct. typical OTC aka over the counter items, non life threating injuries to trauma. This kit was build by wife Sally. I am not going to label all what is in it. This bag will sustain you until emergency care, I am saying realistically injuries: cuts, gashes, limb injuries, minor burns, bad case of the trots things like that.

No the reloading dispenser & the shotgun reloading wads, cards isn't part of it. ;)

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#71
I am a high school teacher, and the recent school shooting in Parkland has me rethinking the boo boo kit I keep in my backpack. First and foremost, I know I need to up my knowledge and skillset in first aid. In addition to taking refresher courses on basic/advanced first aid, and getting re-certified in CPR, I plan to spend my summer taking a first responder course, and seeking out first aid training in an active shooter scenario. An old friend is an EMT instructor, and he is working with me on getting the right education.

Do y'all have any recommendations of where to start for a kit? I have the basic boo boo stuff covered. It seems an ifak is too limited because of quantity. Do I need a grocery sack full of Israeli bandages? Celox gauze? The ifak concept is great when everyone has their own on them, but I'm responsible for about 30 students. Any thoughts or recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
 
#72
You ask a very simple question that does not have a simple answer.

Simply put - have the items on hand that you know how to use. As you get more training, you will want to have more items in your kit.

Boo-boo stuff - a box of Band-Aids, etc. Standard stuff. Israeli or similar style bandages? In your situation, having 10 on hand would be fine - maybe even 20. Gauze pads, QuikClot pads (gauze pads containing QuikClot), Bloodstoppers, gauze rolls - anything to plug holes and stop bleeding.

Tourniquet - a lot of debate on these. I learned how to use them as a kid. As an adult, I was taught not to use them. Today, after fantastic success with them in the sandbox by our soldiers and Marines, they are understood to be a viable lifesaving device. But - learn how to use one properly. Used properly, they can't be beat. Used improperly, they can do permanent additional damage. I carry one in my kit and one in my (shooting) range bag.

One site to purchase medical supplies is Moore Medical. I get a lot from there. Also, Air Gas has a good selection of medical supplies.

As a reference, I carry a backpack style trauma kit in my truck. I'll be more than happy to show it to you, and work with you getting set up.
 
#73
Thanks for the informative thread! As summer adventure season come creeping up I need to refresh mine. I like the MYFAK, looks very nice, I wish they had a middle ground between basic and Premium personally. Premium has a few things I would not use.

My setup now is a Pelican box for meds/band aids ETC, and a small sift bag kit with everything you don't need day top day. The soft bag needs going though and updating.
 
#74
I'm going to revive this because....gear threads are too fun. I used one of the Condor tear-off EMT pouches for a long time. I kept it attached to the side of a car seat bag that I used to ride with daily that was full of all kinds of things I used on the road and in my security jobs...once that line of work came to a close for me, so did the desire to keep carrying that humongous bag around just to keep around a very small, yet overstuffed first aid kit.

Because of sudden cheap availability and compatibility with other gear that I own (I like the Army MOLLE II system, despite it being heavy and awkward for backpacking...), I grabbed one of the "turtleback" medical bags that can clip to my rucksack and got to work filling it full of a gear that I was trained to use years ago (and refreshed on about 1.5 years ago...due to refresh again). Inside it I have tons of gloves, a CAT tourniquet, Israeli-style bandage, Olaes Modular Bandage, Hyfin Chest Seal, disposable CPR masks, Quickclot Z-fold dressing, tons of cheap sterile gauze & trauma pads, waterproof med tape, cohesive bandage, SAM splints, wood sticks for small splints, lots of boo-boo bandaids, 14ga catheter for needle-chest decompression, nasopharyngeal airway, lots of disposable sanitation swabs (BZK, alcohol, and iodine), topical ointments & treatments, and small OTC pill packs for various ailments, plus little odds and ends that I've added in and have forgotten off the top of my head. As well, I do keep triage tape attached to that bag, because it's the bag I commonly carry and keep available for use if I ever have to respond to a mass-casualty type of incident. I can at least triage and provide some aid while I wait for additional help to arrive. Some things are starting to hit their expiration dates, so it's time to start refreshing supplies and also making some upgrades while I'm at it. It's a good pack for taking care of a few people.

I do have an auxiliary kit that I picked up as a relative bargain, which I only take when I'm going to be very remote but close to my vehicle, or I'm going somewhere to serve as backup medical support... It's also the only kit I own that's equipped off-the-shelf, so I can conveniently just link to the manufacturer page for it: https://www.narescue.com/warrior-aid-and-litter-kit-walk

I primarily own it because of wanting a collapsible litter and good carrier for it, but all of the trauma supplies included extra were too great to pass up just snagging that system. It cost me about $300 OTD to get that kit, replace missing components, and replace expired components. The litter alone costs more than that if you buy it direct from NAR. Definitely does a better job at patching up bullet holes, but it's not a bad option to help extract and protect someone that is not ambulatory in the wilderness.
 
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#78
I’ll revive this one this time!

We had an accident on Friday on some new electric kick scooters On the way to a friend’s house...three blocks from our house. As soon as I saw the wound, I knew I had to hold it closed. Simply going to a friend’s house meant no first aid kit. It was also four blocks to the fire station so I called 911.

They bandaged her up (see comment from earlier about how EMS may not stitch you up and what the heck would I have done with a stitch kit?). Once EMS was there, I was able to go get the car and then off to the ER.

Result: 3 hand stitches, 3 internal knee stitches and 11 external stitches.

Lesson: I had my camelback, but our little Adventure Medical first aid kit lives in the bathroom drawer. It is small and light enough to live in the backpack and would have been great to help apply pressure instead of just my hands holding the wound closed. We’ll be buying some extra small kits to stash in our backpacks, camp trailer and each vehicle. I also need to renew my SPOT subscription since I’m dirt biking in remote, no cell service areas now.

Other concern: I now work in the construction industry. These tools, saws, big equipment, etc will take your finger off before you know what happened! I gotta double check our FAKs in the work trucks!
 
#79
Good bump. Ordered my medic kits (plus some add ons) last week. I have a small kit I take backpacking, but wanted a bigger one for the big truck and the new Tundra.

Agreed that sutchers are good, but REALLY hard to use cleanly in the backcountry.
 

Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#80
Good bump. Ordered my medic kits (plus some add ons) last week. I have a small kit I take backpacking, but wanted a bigger one for the big truck and the new Tundra.

Agreed that sutchers are good, but REALLY hard to use cleanly in the backcountry.
The only time you should use sutures is IF you have the ability to to debride and disinfect the wound thoroughly using a product like betadine, and the ability to then back up the wound closure with a full course of antibiotics.

Otherwise, you are basically trapping the germs inside the flesh, creating a reservoir of nastiness for them to have a party.

** The ONLY time I would deviate from this is if closure was somehow indicated to facilitate hemorrhage control, which is more likely a battlefield type injury vice back country injury. Unless you've been mauled by a bear of course in which case you'll need more than just a couple sutures! **

BOTTOM LINE: If your wound is bad enough to need sutures, the trip is over and it's time to go to town and seek medical care. It's also time sensitive as you need them applied within the first 24 hrs. So control bleeding, stabilize the wound and pack up and go NOW if you are in doubt.
 
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