Recovery Gear: Ongoing Discussion and Reviews

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Even More. Quoting these guys
https://www.velasailingsupply.com/tylaska-ring-ferrule-fr26-for-1-in-line-38mm-id-x-96mm-od/

Applications

Ferrules are ideal for applications such as barber haulers, spinnaker twings or other uses that have small turning angles and little line movement. They also work great for backstay adjusters when used in a high purchase cascade configuration. Ferrules start having frictional heating and wear problems when there is significant line movement so conventional pulleys are still better for applications such as mainsheet and halyard blocks.
 
Been looking at these.
Factor 55 just released their rope retention pulley that looks interesting and apparently won a bunch of awards.
I was going to pick one up when available.
 

Greg

Adventurist
Senior Staff
Yes I cant see how they would not heat and cause friction. Its the enemy of all synthetic lines..... I won one, and have yet to test it. But it seems to me there is a ton of friction no matter how you do in that set up.
I can see using one to redirect a winch line that's being used to steady a vehicle and as an anchor.

Just as the friction increased the load on the winch it can be used to increase the holding strength of a winch line being used to steady a vehicle. Instead of a pulley it's being used as a capstan.
 

Dean

Adventurist
Founding Member
But it seems to me there is a ton of friction no matter how you do in that set up.
The only way I'd use one is if the soft shackle had an abrasion sheath on it. Basically it's just 1" tubular webbing. I consider it sacrifical. If it heats up, even just a little, the guard can be replaced. That said, I doubt I'd be pulling hard enough fast enough to build up enough friction. It will be nice to get my hands on one and do some real world testing though.
 
You don't need speed to cause friction if you have enough load. Think about the heat you can get loosening an really tight nut or bolt (e.g., the nuts on the u-bolts holding your leaf springs to the axle). Now multiply the force you were putting into that wrench handle by whatever load you are putting on that line with a winch instead of your hand.
 
The only way I'd use one is if the soft shackle had an abrasion sheath on it. Basically it's just 1" tubular webbing. I consider it sacrifical. If it heats up, even just a little, the guard can be replaced. That said, I doubt I'd be pulling hard enough fast enough to build up enough friction. It will be nice to get my hands on one and do some real world testing though.
Yes the one I have has a sheath on it. However the heat will still transfer thru to the shackle IMO. it wont be abraded directly, but still will get hot.

You don't need speed to cause friction if you have enough load. Think about the heat you can get loosening an really tight nut or bolt (e.g., the nuts on the u-bolts holding your leaf springs to the axle). Now multiply the force you were putting into that wrench handle by whatever load you are putting on that line with a winch instead of your hand.
I like the bolt ideology! And yes huge load plus friction will creature heat, even at low line speeds. (well all winching is pretty low line speed in the grand scheme of things).

Finally got a chance to watch the video that started all this. Maybe not perfectly scientific, but it was a way bigger spread than I expected!

I have one of these sitting here..... I could do some tests....

Also note, from the Tylaska site. Of the suggested uses none are in a pulley configuration.

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Dean

Adventurist
Founding Member
Also note, from the Tylaska site. Of the suggested uses none are in a pulley configuration.

Interesting point. Having spent my time on a sail boat I can attest to all of those rigging options (save two: turnbuckle/thimble - as picture) would have movement involved. However, rather than the eye rotating around the rope as a pulley the rope is passing through the eye. Obviously there is still a measured amount of friction/heat as the rope passes through the eye... but it's not localized/concentrated the way it would be if used as a pulley. That said, I'm not sure I'd use it that way as a "pulley" in a vehicle recovery due to the angle through the eye if doing a 180* pull.
 
This is interesting, they have another video where they tested several straps trying to find a solution to stop the recoil of the strap.

 

Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
Speaking of "snatch rings versus snatch blocks"...

IMHO, this is the "best of breed" pulley block. Safe Xtract.

This is the pinnacle in safety and performance for a snatch block. A snatch block is a pulley with side plates (cheeks) that can be opened to reeve the line into the block. Their patent pending “X-Lock” is used to shorten winch lines, belay, connect lines, and distribute loads in bridle configurations. This block has a WLL (working load limit) of 20000 LB and is more than enough for any recovery situation you will ever encounter, unless you're driving a garbage truck.

Safe-Xtract pulley blocks are currently in service with US SOCOM units. They have been validated by the Nevada Automotive Test Center for US Special Operations Command, and have been selected by the US Army’s 1st Special Forces Regiment to be the pulley block training standard within US Army Special Forces Groups. They were selected for use by the West Virginia Army National Guard Mobility Testing Center for Special Operations Ground Mobility training, and have been certified for use by several other specialized Government Agencies.

Buy once. Cry once.

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IMG_1560__59297.1558150093.1280.1280.jpg

http://www.asroffroad.com/20-000-lb-safe-xtract-pulley-block/
 

bob91yj

Adventurist
Founding Member
I'm sure there have been occasions over the years that I could have used a snatch block during a recovery. I've only really NEEDED one on one occasion, can't remember if I used the one I had or someone else's. My old mentor into the off highway world had a saying...I'd rather be looking at it than looking for it...

I'm a huge believer in quality safety/recovery and first aid gear, not a place to cut corners, but we all have to draw the line some where between functional, and premium. I'd love to see someone bust out a shackle like that, I'll put my Warn version right back in the bag that I found it in. If I was an off highway guide, or spent a LOT of time getting myself stuck on my own, top shelf gear such as that shackle would move higher up on the priority list.

IMO, when it comes to gear like this, you co-ordinate with the crew you normally wheel with and "split the load" when possible. I quit carrying a Hi-Lift jack years ago for example...anytime one is needed there are 20 people begging to use the one they've hauled around for years and never used. Instead, I carry a Safe Jack set up...not so many of those out on the trail, sure handy when needed, covers most of the same bases for me that a Hi-Lift does (of course there are exceptions to that, not looking for a lesson on Hi-Lifts and their uses).

Which brings up another point. If you carry a Hi-Lift, verify that you have lift points that will make use of the Hi-Lift...READ AND HEED THE SAFETY WARNINGS. ******NEVER get your head in the arc of the handle****** PRACTICE with the Hi-Lift in your driveway. Hi-Lifts are an awesome tool...and an emergency room visit looking for a place to happen. When you do get it out to practice...a good old can of Coca-Cola on the frozen operating mechanism usually does the trick...then clean/lube it properly!:cool:
 
I had to right a rolled over truck down in a valley last spring. Truck weighed in @ 7000 lbs, my winch is a Warn M12000 12,000 pound winch. I immediately used my pulley block for double line pulls. Why would I with a 12k winch? I knew I was going to be performing several pulls, I lost count after 6. Winches have a duty cycle and they lose maximum winching capacity once the second layer of rope starts to spool on the drum. You lose approximately 13% of winch capacity with every layer of rope. By utilizing a double line pull I decreased maximum amperage draw by about 40% and decreased stress on the winch, and allowed me to spool on more rope without losing winch efficiency. Once the vehicle was pointed in the right direction up hill we had to lay down 8 Maxtrax over a snow field that was next to the road to bridge or cross the snowfield. we had to shuffle the Maxtrax as we pulled over the snow field several times. My truck was the only other vehicle we had no group of back ups, vehicle sympathy is real and so is equipment sympathy.
 
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Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
The X-Lock from Safe Xtract is a useful addition to any kit. It shortens winch lines and winch line extensions, enables you to belay your vehicle down dangerous slopes, and connects lines with end loops. Here’s how it works:

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