Bug Out Bags: Basic Gear You Need to Have

#41
I remember the webbing chairs - yes, they were comfortable.

So many chairs today aren't.

Ever sat in a chair at the store, thought 'not bad, pretty comfy' and bought it, only to get it home, sit in it, and after 10 minutes you wish you hadn't bought it? I have a collection of those.........
 
#42
Their minimalist Kessel pot is also extremely well thought out.
@Dave Do I recall correctly that you also have a Snow Peak Kettle #1? If so, other than slightly smaller capacity, how do they compare?

I have the K1, but I got it to replace an '80s aluminum no-name tea kettle. It's a nice pot, and just a so-so kettle. I'm assuming the Kessel weight of 16 oz. includes the bag vs. the 9 oz. for the Snow Peak. I do like that handle!

I have some Uberleben products, and they seem good quality. A couple of the fire starters, and the girls got the 12 oz Lore kuksa for a birthday. I use it, but only because it was a gift...

I remember the webbing chairs - yes, they were comfortable.
I still have a couple out in the back of the barn. Probably a webbing kit or two, too, but they're so old they are probably rotten, too. I've got a pair of the discontinued Helinox chairs that are similar to the current Sunset. High (er) seat and tall back. But yes, they are not comfortable to be leaning forward on while doing some task; just lounging.
 

Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#44
Another good thing to have these days is a way to charge devices via solar power. I use this weatherproof 28 W panel by Off Grid Trek in Canada.

I like the fact that their stuff is designed for Canadian conditions vice fair weather use. As an example, most of what is sold on the market is only 10%-12% Efficiency Rating, meaning they work in direct sunlight, then stop working when covered 30% by shade from a branch or a cloud.

Many solar manufacturers like to use the up to symbol (>), which we all know is the same as a car maker saying you will get up to a certain MPG, which only happens if there is a full moon, going downhill, and the car is turned off. These panels are a true 23.5% Efficiency rating, the highest available meaning the quickest charge times.

This means that even in the worst rainy, overcast conditions (shown below) you will still be able to trickle charge your device.

EAD397F2-741A-45EF-BEC6-8A83DCC422AC.jpeg
13C2DE85-8C1F-4476-A543-89A331D1D0CB.jpeg
D1A6FC1E-D762-4F14-8B4B-B74E9C7F0880.jpeg
5C86F6E0-B02D-41E1-98D0-44A2EF223C0F.jpeg
D25673B6-7064-4468-98DE-670BEE6C4831.jpeg
 
#45
A twist on the BOB bag.This is my 22 lbs. urban get home bag. This bag resides in my commuter Honda Accord. This is to get me home primarily after a earthquake or violent peaceful protesters blocking roads/freeway. Both bigger concerns here in the PNW.

My oneway commute is 41.5 miles crosses 8 channels of water three of them being larger rivers that dump into Puget Sound. I plan to drive as far as possible then hoof it when that is no longer an option. I have numerous friends along the I5 corridor so shelter has been specifically left out as I feel it’s unnecessary for this use. One other item omitted is a firearm. Not that I’m against them, but I work on federal property and technically can’t carry. If the protesters progress up the I5 corridor from downtown Seattle core we will know enough in advance.

This pack contains all the items one would expect in a BOB but has the Gray Man look. I have to say this Osprey pack is one of my better more comfortable backpacks.

E8B653CF-560F-4C30-9DF7-7524B16F93CC.jpeg AAE6A41C-02C9-48DF-84E7-BA3DD539FF21.jpeg 4C2D7F07-5530-40E4-8B0B-A1F20080474A.jpeg 3BCE6446-2582-4C09-8E46-EA9CCF0A692D.jpeg
 
#46
The greyman theory, good one.

As a prepper the wife & I used to attend many prepper & preparedness expos's in the mid west. You listen to many of these new-be's survivialist, preppers, they are too busy talking & becoming tactical "Timmys." They wont even listen about the greyman theory which IMO is the best plan in a SHTF crisis situation when stuck in a heavly populated area. The technique is to go under the radar with out being noticed, blend in & get home unscathed.
 

Dave

Adventurist
Founder
Senior Staff
Editor
#47
This pack contains all the items one would expect in a BOB but has the Gray Man look. I have to say this Osprey pack is one of my better more comfortable backpacks.
“The Gray Man NEVER draws attention to himself by word, dress, action, or mannerism. The Young Gray Man is dismissed as a wimp, the Older as a doddering old fool. The Gray Man derives great inner satisfaction from having this portrayal of himself accepted by all he meets, for it means he is succeeding in his disguise of his actual persona.”

A very wise approach. I’m a big fan of Osprey, which model is that?
 
#50
You can always add a lightweight camo or muted color raincover if you might need to be less visible; i.e. if you have to travel through the woods or are traveling after hours.
I work second shift and will until I retire, it’s always after hours. This is a urban get home, no woods to be concerned with. The bodies of water to cross are more of a issue post earthquake. If major bridges are down I’d be forced to walk to up stream towns to cross a bridge or hire a boat to take me across Puget Sound to the south end of my island.
 
#51
This has lot to do with get home bag, bugging out or bugging in is OPSEC "operations security" many people are unprepared in this world & when chaos arises no matter man caused, mother nature the prepared will be sought after, after the unprepared resources run dry.

The unprepared will rely on government to take care of them & we all know how the government takes care of their own 1st before the people by past disasters & crisis. This is why in many cases IMO "we the prepared don’t need to rely on the government when a crisis or disaster occurs. IMO when things in society are @ a norm unprepared "sheep" will go as they do day by day life seeing it thru a toliet paper roll, but on the other side people on the survivial\preparedness will continue there training, learning & adding to cashes, least Sally & I do. We make everything look like things are normal, not attracting attention to us, Greyman theory. There is a term used in the preparedness community called "behavioral camouflage" avoid drawing attention by acting lost & confused as the rest of the crowd. If Sally & I speak to anyone, we are very careful about what we say. Again IMO the goal is to avoid any stimuli that would either attract attention immediately or make someone more inclined to remember us later on.

This is were "I" think Greyman theory & OPSEC go together like coffee belongs in a cup.
 

Robert

Adventurist
#53
I work second shift and will until I retire, it’s always after hours. This is a urban get home, no woods to be concerned with. The bodies of water to cross are more of a issue post earthquake. If major bridges are down I’d be forced to walk to up stream towns to cross a bridge or hire a boat to take me across Puget Sound to the south end of my island.

I've known a couple of people who kept one of those small, lightweight, inflatable boats in their bag or truck in case they had to cross a smallish river but that's not really a good option for crossing something like that sound, more like a really, really bad last ditch idea. I think the lightest of the inflatable kayaks that might be worth trying that are in the mid twenty pounds and bulky.

I'd say look into picking up an inexpensive bike and leaving it at work or nearby if possible. You can pick up a Walmart bike on sale or used, grease it up well and leave it locked to a bike rack. It'll exponentially increase your speed if needed and I've always believed speed was one of the primary things folks should consider- early recognition of a problem then getting away ahead of the masses quickly before they panic and the goblins see opportunity (the more folks I can avoid the better).

Along the idea of speed, I always read BOB type threads with a bit of interest as people post up how much stuff they carry yet they're often out of shape, don't hike or only do short jaunts, don't carry much if any pack pack when they do and most of the equipment looks new and untested. Work can make it hard for most folks to spend a couple of hours on a trail but if you think you may have to hike home you really ought to try to get out as much as possible-and ruck. Getting out there, preferably with the pack you intend to carry, is the best prep but I've become a big fan of the "rucking" style hiking as well. No need to spend a fortune on the GoRuck stuff although it's well made if you can afford it, there are cheaper plates available or you can do it the old fashioned and cheap way and buy a bag of sand and make sandbag "pills" to put in your bag. There are plenty of examples on-line but I bought a 50# bag of play sand at Home Depot for $5, put it on a tarp and cut it into two sections, 1/3 and 2/3. Weigh out whatever you want, in my case I made a 10# and a 20#, then toss the rest of the sand in your yard. The 10# went in the 1/3 section of the bag and the 20# went in the other then I rolled them and wrapped well with duct tape. As I'm sure we all know, if you're not used to carrying weight on your back you're going to know it pretty quickly and it's going to slow you down and make you miserable. It's only going to be worse the second day if you can't make the trip in one day since you're going to be sore and probably won't sleep well or comfortably which means you're going to move even slower. Just some things to think about (and help justify that titanium spork :D).
 
#54
I've known a couple of people who kept one of those small, lightweight, inflatable boats in their bag or truck in case they had to cross a smallish river but that's not really a good option for crossing something like that sound, more like a really, really bad last ditch idea. I think the lightest of the inflatable kayaks that might be worth trying that are in the mid twenty pounds and bulky.

I'd say look into picking up an inexpensive bike and leaving it at work or nearby if possible. You can pick up a Walmart bike on sale or used, grease it up well and leave it locked to a bike rack. It'll exponentially increase your speed if needed and I've always believed speed was one of the primary things folks should consider- early recognition of a problem then getting away ahead of the masses quickly before they panic and the goblins see opportunity (the more folks I can avoid the better).

Along the idea of speed, I always read BOB type threads with a bit of interest as people post up how much stuff they carry yet they're often out of shape, don't hike or only do short jaunts, don't carry much if any pack pack when they do and most of the equipment looks new and untested. Work can make it hard for most folks to spend a couple of hours on a trail but if you think you may have to hike home you really ought to try to get out as much as possible-and ruck. Getting out there, preferably with the pack you intend to carry, is the best prep but I've become a big fan of the "rucking" style hiking as well. No need to spend a fortune on the GoRuck stuff although it's well made if you can afford it, there are cheaper plates available or you can do it the old fashioned and cheap way and buy a bag of sand and make sandbag "pills" to put in your bag. There are plenty of examples on-line but I bought a 50# bag of play sand at Home Depot for $5, put it on a tarp and cut it into two sections, 1/3 and 2/3. Weigh out whatever you want, in my case I made a 10# and a 20#, then toss the rest of the sand in your yard. The 10# went in the 1/3 section of the bag and the 20# went in the other then I rolled them and wrapped well with duct tape. As I'm sure we all know, if you're not used to carrying weight on your back you're going to know it pretty quickly and it's going to slow you down and make you miserable. It's only going to be worse the second day if you can't make the trip in one day since you're going to be sore and probably won't sleep well or comfortably which means you're going to move even slower. Just some things to think about (and help justify that titanium spork :D).

Thanks! I used to be an avid road cyclist and it would crack me up that folks would go out and drop 7-8K on the newest lightweight bike that was 4 lbs lighter than mine when they could stand to lose 10-15 lbs.

With that being said I ski all winter long with a 15 lbs+- backpack with Avi gear water and the basics, food, extra layers, in the fall I'll hike locally with a pack.

If it comes down to needing to cross the Sound, fastest way to my Island. I would go to the Everett Marina and flash some cash for the ride home.
 
Top Bottom